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Luke 11:4

    Luke 11:4 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And forgive us our sins; for we also forgive every one that is indebted to us. And lead us not into temptation; but deliver us from evil.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And forgive us our sins; for we also forgive every one that is indebted to us. And lead us not into temptation; but deliver us from evil.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And forgive us our sins; for we ourselves also forgive every one that is indebted to us. And bring us not into temptation.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    May we have forgiveness for our sins, as we make free all those who are in debt to us. And let us not be put to the test.

    Webster's Revision

    And forgive us our sins; for we ourselves also forgive every one that is indebted to us. And bring us not into temptation.

    World English Bible

    Forgive us our sins, for we ourselves also forgive everyone who is indebted to us. Bring us not into temptation, but deliver us from the evil one.'"

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And forgive us our sins; for we ourselves also forgive every one that is indebted to us. And bring us not into temptation.

    Clarke's Commentary on Luke 11:4

    Lead us not into temptation, etc. - Dr. Lightfoot believes that this petition is intended against the visible apparitions of the devil, and his actual obsessions; he thinks that the meaning is too much softened by our translation. Deliver us from evil, is certainly a very inadequate rendering of ῥυσαι ἡμας απο του πονηρου; literally, Deliver us from the wicked one.

    Barnes' Notes on Luke 11:4

    For we also forgive ... - This is somewhat different from the expression in Matthew, though the sense is the same. The idea is, that unless we forgive others, God will not forgive us; and unless we come to him "really" forgiving all others, we cannot expect pardon. It does not mean that by forgiving others we "deserve" forgiveness ourselves, or "merit it," but that this is a disposition or state of mind without which God cannot consistently pardon us.

    Every one that is indebted to us - Every one that has "injured" us. This does not refer to pecuniary transactions, but to offences similar to those which "we" have committed against God, and for which we ask forgiveness. Besides the variations in the "expressions" in this prayer, Luke has omitted the doxology, or close, altogether; and this shows that Jesus did nor intend that we should always use just this "form," but that it was a general direction how to pray; or, rather, that we were to pray for these "things," though not always using the same words.

    Wesley's Notes on Luke 11:4

    11:4 Forgive us; for we forgive them - Not once, but continually. This does not denote the meritorious cause of our pardon; but the removal of that hinderance which otherwise would render it impossible.