Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

Luke 12:19

    Luke 12:19 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And I will say to my soul, Soul, thou hast much goods laid up for many years; take thine ease, eat, drink, and be merry.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And I will say to my soul, Soul, you have much goods laid up for many years; take your ease, eat, drink, and be merry.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And I will say to my soul, Soul, thou hast much goods laid up for many years; take thine ease, eat, drink, be merry.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And I will say to my soul, Soul, you have a great amount of goods in store, enough for a number of years; be at rest, take food and wine and be happy.

    Webster's Revision

    And I will say to my soul, Soul, thou hast much goods laid up for many years; take thine ease, eat, drink, be merry.

    World English Bible

    I will tell my soul, "Soul, you have many goods laid up for many years. Take your ease, eat, drink, be merry."'

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And I will say to my soul, Soul, thou hast much goods laid up for many years; take thine ease, eat, drink, be merry.

    Clarke's Commentary on Luke 12:19

    Soul, thou hast much goods - Great possessions are generally accompanied with pride, idleness, and luxury; and these are the greatest enemies to salvation. Moderate poverty, as one justly observes, is a great talent in order to salvation; but it is one which nobody desires.

    Take thine ease, eat, drink, and be merry - This was exactly the creed of the ancient Atheists and Epicureans. Ede, bibe, lude; post mortem nulla voluptas. What a wretched portion for an immortal spirit! and yet those who know not God have no other, and many of them not even this.

    Barnes' Notes on Luke 12:19

    Much goods - Much property. Enough to last a long while, so that there is no need of anxiety or labor.

    Take thine ease - Be free from care about the future. Have no anxiety about coming to want.

    Eat, drink, and be merry - This was just the doctrine of the ancient Epicureans and atheists, and it is, alas! too often the doctrine of those who are rich. They think that all that is valuable in life is to eat, and drink, and be cheerful or merry. Hence, their chief anxiety is to obtain the "delicacies of the season " - the luxuries of the world; to secure the productions of every clime at any expense, and to be distinguished for splendid repasts and a magnificent style of living. What a portion is this for an immortal soul! What folly to think that "all" that a man lives for is to satisfy his sensual appetites; to forget that he has an intellect to be cultivated, a heart to be purified, a soul to be saved!