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Luke 12:21

    Luke 12:21 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    So is he that layeth up treasure for himself, and is not rich toward God.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    So is he that lays up treasure for himself, and is not rich toward God.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    So is he that layeth up treasure for himself, and is not rich toward God.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    So that is what comes to the man who gets wealth for himself, and has not wealth in the eyes of God.

    Webster's Revision

    So is he that layeth up treasure for himself, and is not rich toward God.

    World English Bible

    So is he who lays up treasure for himself, and is not rich toward God."

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    So is he that layeth up treasure for himself, and is not rich toward God.

    Clarke's Commentary on Luke 12:21

    So is he - That is, thus will it be. This is not an individual case; all who make this life their portion, and who are destitute of the peace and salvation of God, shall, sooner or later, be surprised in the same way.

    Layeth up treasure for himself - This is the essential characteristic of a covetous man: he desires riches; he gets them; he lays them up, not for the necessary uses to which they might be devoted, but for himself; to please himself, and to gratify his avaricious soul. Such a person is commonly called a miser, i.e. literally, a wretched, miserable man.

    Barnes' Notes on Luke 12:21

    So is he - This is the portion or the doom.

    Layeth up treasure for himself - Acquires riches for his own use - for "himself." This is the characteristic of the covetous man. It is all for "himself." His plans terminate there. He lives only for himself, and acts only with regard to his own interest.

    Rich toward God - Has no inheritance in the kingdom of God - no riches laid up in heaven. His affections are all fixed on this world, and he has none for God.

    From this instructive parable we learn:

    1. That wicked people are often signally prospered - their ground brings forth plentifully. God gives them their desire, but sends leanness into their souls.

    2. That riches bring with them always an increasing load of cares and anxieties.

    3. That they steal away the affections from God - are sly, insinuating, and dangerous to the soul.

    4. That the anxiety of a covetous man is not what "good" he may do with his wealth, but where he may hoard it, and keep it secure from doing any good.

    5. That riches cannot secure their haughty owners from the grave. Death will come upon them suddenly, unexpectedly, awfully. In the very midst of the brightest anticipations - in a moment - in the twinkling of an eye it may come, and all the wealth that has been accumulated cannot alleviate one pang, or drive away one fear, or prolong life for one moment.

    6. That the man who is trusting to his riches in this manner is a fool in the sight of God. Soon, also, he will be a fool in his "own" sight, and will go to hell with the consciousness that his life has been one of eminent folly.

    7. That the path of true wisdom is to seek first the kingdom of God, and to be ready to die; and "then" it matters little what is our portion here, or how suddenly or soon we are called away to meet our Judge. If our affections are not fixed on our riches, we shall leave them without regret. If our treasures are laid up in heaven, death will be but "going home," and happy will be that moment when we are called to our rest.

    Wesley's Notes on Luke 12:21

    12:21 Rich toward God - Namely, in faith, and love, and good works.