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Luke 12:49

    Luke 12:49 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    I am come to send fire on the earth; and what will I, if it be already kindled?

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    I am come to send fire on the earth; and what will I, if it be already kindled?

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    I came to cast fire upon the earth; and what do I desire, if it is already kindled?

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    I came to send a fire on the earth, and it may even now have been lighted.

    Webster's Revision

    I came to cast fire upon the earth; and what do I desire, if it is already kindled?

    World English Bible

    "I came to throw fire on the earth. I wish it were already kindled.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    I came to cast fire upon the earth; and what will I, if it is already kindled?

    Clarke's Commentary on Luke 12:49

    I am come to send fire - See this subject largely explained on Matthew 10:34 (note), etc. From the connection in which these words stand, both in this place and in Matthew, it appears as if our Lord intended by the word fire, not only the consuming influence of the Roman sword, but also the influence of his own Spirit in the destruction of sin. In both these senses this fire was already kindled: as yet, however, it appeared but as a spark, but was soon to break out into an all-consuming flame.

    Barnes' Notes on Luke 12:49

    I am, come ... - The result of my coming will be that there will be divisions and contentions. He does not mean that he came "for" that purpose, or that he "sought" and "desired" it; but that such was the state of the human heart, and such the opposition of people to the truth, that that would be the "effect" of his coming. See the notes at Matthew 10:34.

    Fire - Fire, here, is the emblem of discord and contention, and consequently of calamities. Thus it is used in Psalm 66:12; Isaiah 43:2.

    And what will I ... - This passage might be better expressed in this manner: "And what would I, but that it were kindled. Since it is "necessary" for the advancement of religion that such divisions should take place; since the gospel cannot be established without conflicts, and strifes, and hatreds, I am even desirous that they should come. Since the greatest blessing which mankind can receive must be attended with such unhappy divisions, I am willing, nay, desirous that they should come." He did not wish evil in itself; but, as it was the occasion of good, he was desirous, if it "must" take place, that it should take place soon. From this we learn:

    1. That the promotion of religion may be expected to produce many contests and bitter feelings.

    2. That the heart of man must be exceedingly wicked, or it would not oppose a work like the Christian religion.

    3. That though God cannot look on evil with approbation, yet, for the sake of the benefit which may grow out of it, he is willing to permit it, and suffer it to come into the world.

    Wesley's Notes on Luke 12:49

    12:49 I am come to send fire - To spread the fire of heavenly love over all the earth.