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Luke 14:17

    Luke 14:17 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And sent his servant at supper time to say to them that were bidden, Come; for all things are now ready.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And sent his servant at supper time to say to them that were bidden, Come; for all things are now ready.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    and he sent forth his servant at supper time to say to them that were bidden, Come; for all things are now ready.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And when the time had come, he sent his servants to say to them, Come, for all things are now ready.

    Webster's Revision

    and he sent forth his servant at supper time to say to them that were bidden, Come; for all things are now ready.

    World English Bible

    He sent out his servant at supper time to tell those who were invited, 'Come, for everything is ready now.'

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    and he sent forth his servant at supper time to say to them that were bidden, Come; for all things are now ready.

    Clarke's Commentary on Luke 14:17

    Sent his servant - Messengers are sent to invite the guests to a Hindoo feast; when not only relations, but all persons of the same division of caste in the neighborhood, are invited. A refusal to attend is considered as a great affront.

    Barnes' Notes on Luke 14:17

    Sent his servant - An invitation had been sent before, but this servant was sent at the time that the supper was ready. From this it would seem that it was the custom to announce to those invited just the time when the feast was prepared. The custom here referred to still prevails in Palestine. Dr. Thomson ("The Land and the Book," vol. i. p. 178) says: "If a sheikh, beg, or emeer invites, he always sends a servant to call you at the proper time. This servant often repeats the very formula mentioned in Luke 14:17; Tefŭddŭlû, el 'asha hâder. Come, for the supper is ready. The fact that this custom is mainly confined to the wealthy and to the nobility is in strict agreement with the parable, where the certain man who made the great supper and bade many is supposed to be of this class. It is true now, as then, that to refuse is a high insult to the maker of the feast, nor would such excuses as those in the parable be more acceptable to a Druse emeer than they were to the lord of this 'great supper.'"