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Luke 14:23

    Luke 14:23 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And the lord said unto the servant, Go out into the highways and hedges, and compel them to come in, that my house may be filled.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And the lord said to the servant, Go out into the highways and hedges, and compel them to come in, that my house may be filled.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And the lord said unto the servant, Go out into the highways and hedges, and constrain them to come in, that my house may be filled.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And the lord said to the servant, Go out into the roads and the fields, and make them come in, so that my house may be full.

    Webster's Revision

    And the lord said unto the servant, Go out into the highways and hedges, and constrain them to come in, that my house may be filled.

    World English Bible

    "The lord said to the servant, 'Go out into the highways and hedges, and compel them to come in, that my house may be filled.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And the lord said unto the servant, Go out into the highways and hedges, and constrain them to come in, that my house may be filled.

    Clarke's Commentary on Luke 14:23

    Compel them to come in - αναγκασον, Prevail on them by the most earnest entreaties. The word is used by Matthew, Matthew 14:22, and by Mark, Mark 6:45; in both which places, when Christ is said, αναγκαζειν, to constrain his disciples to get into the vessel, nothing but his commanding or persuading them to do it can be reasonably understood. The Latins use cogo, and compello, in exactly the same sense, i.e. to prevail on by prayers, counsels, entreaties, etc. See several examples in Bishop Pearce, and in Kypke. No other kind of constraint is ever recommended in the Gospel of Christ; every other kind of compulsion is antichristian, can only be submitted to by cowards and knaves, and can produce nothing but hypocrites, See at the end of the chapter.

    Barnes' Notes on Luke 14:23

    Go out into the highways - Since enough had not been found in the lanes and streets, he commands the servant to go into the roads - the public highways out of the city, as well as to the streets "in" it - and invite them also.

    Hedges - A hedge is the inclosure around a field or vineyard. It was commonly made of thorns, which were planted thick, and which kept the cattle out of the vineyard. "A common plant for this purpose is the prickly pear, a species of cactus, which grows several feet high, and as thick as a man's body, armed with sharp thorns, and thus forming an almost impervious defense" (Professor Hackett, "Scripture Illustrations," p. 174). Those in the hedges were poor laborers employed in planting them or trimming them - people of the lowest class and of great poverty. By his directing them to go first into the streets of the city and then into the highways, we are not to understand our Saviour as referring to different classes of people, but only as denoting the "earnestness" with which God offers salvation to people, and his willingness that the most despised should come and live. Some parts of parables are thrown in for the sake of "keeping," and they should not be pressed or forced to obtain any obscure or fanciful signification. The great point in this parable was, that God would call in the Gentiles after the Jews had rejected the gospel. This should be kept always in view in interpreting all the parts of the parable.

    Compel them - That is, urge them, press them earnestly, one and all. Do not hear their excuses on account of their poverty and low rank of life, but urge them so as to overcome their objections and lead them to the feast. This expresses the "earnestness" of the man; his anxiety that his table should be filled, and his purpose not to reject any on account of their poverty, or ignorance, or want of apparel. So God is earnest in regard to the most polluted and vile. He commands his servants, his ministers, to "urge" them to come, to "press" on them the salvation of the gospel, and to use all the means in their power to bring into heaven poor and needy sinners.