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Luke 14:26

    Luke 14:26 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    If any man come to me, and hate not his father, and mother, and wife, and children, and brethren, and sisters, yea, and his own life also, he cannot be my disciple.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    If any man come to me, and hate not his father, and mother, and wife, and children, and brothers, and sisters, yes, and his own life also, he cannot be my disciple.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    If any man cometh unto me, and hateth not his own father, and mother, and wife, and children, and brethren, and sisters, yea, and his own life also, he cannot be my disciple.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And turning round, he said to them, If any man comes to me, and has not hate for his father and mother and wife and children and brothers and sisters, and even for his life, he may not be my disciple.

    Webster's Revision

    If any man cometh unto me, and hateth not his own father, and mother, and wife, and children, and brethren, and sisters, yea, and his own life also, he cannot be my disciple.

    World English Bible

    "If anyone comes to me, and doesn't disregard his own father, mother, wife, children, brothers, and sisters, yes, and his own life also, he can't be my disciple.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    If any man cometh unto me, and hateth not his own father, and mother, and wife, and children, and brethren, and sisters, yea, and his own life also, he cannot be my disciple.

    Definitions for Luke 14:26

    Yea - Yes; certainly.

    Clarke's Commentary on Luke 14:26

    And hate not - Matthew, Matthew 10:37, expresses the true meaning of this word, when he says, He who loveth his father and mother More than me. In Matthew 6:24, he uses the word hate in the same sense. When we read, Romans 9:13, Jacob have I loved, but Esau have I hated, the meaning is simply, I have loved Jacob - the Israelites, more than Esau - the Edomites; and that this is no arbitrary interpretation of the word hate, but one agreeable to the Hebrew idiom, appears from what is said on Genesis 29:30, Genesis 29:31, where Leah's being hated is explained by Rachel's being loved more than Leah. See also Deuteronomy 21:15-17; and Bishop Pearce on this place. See also the notes on Matthew 10:37 (note).

    Wesley's Notes on Luke 14:26

    14:26 If any man come to me, and hate not his father - Comparatively to Christ: yea, so as actually to renounce his field, oxen, wife, all things, and act as if he hated them, when they stand in competition with him. Mt 10:37.