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Luke 15:30

    Luke 15:30 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    But as soon as this thy son was come, which hath devoured thy living with harlots, thou hast killed for him the fatted calf.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    But as soon as this your son was come, which has devoured your living with harlots, you have killed for him the fatted calf.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    but when this thy son came, who hath devoured thy living with harlots, thou killedst for him the fatted calf.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    But when this your son came, who has been wasting your property with bad women, you put to death the fat young ox for him.

    Webster's Revision

    but when this thy son came, who hath devoured thy living with harlots, thou killedst for him the fatted calf.

    World English Bible

    But when this, your son, came, who has devoured your living with prostitutes, you killed the fattened calf for him.'

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    but when this thy son came, which hath devoured thy living with harlots, thou killedst for him the fatted calf.

    Clarke's Commentary on Luke 15:30

    This thy son - This son of Thine - words expressive of supreme contempt: This son - he would not condescend to call him by his name, or to acknowledge him for his brother; and at the same time, bitterly reproaches his amiable father for his affectionate tenderness, and readiness to receive his once undutiful, but now penitent, child!

    For Him - I have marked those words in small capitals which should be strongly accented in the pronunciation: this last word shows how supremely he despised his poor unfortunate brother.

    Barnes' Notes on Luke 15:30

    This thy son - This son of "thine." This is an expression of great contempt. He did not call him "his brother," but "his father's son," to show at once his contempt for his younger brother, and for his father for having received him as he did. Never was there a more striking instance of petty malice, or more unjustifiable disregard of a father's conduct and will.

    Thy living - Thy property. This is still designed to irritate the father, and set him against his younger son. It was true that the younger son had been guilty, and foolish, and ungrateful; but he was penitent, and "that" was of more consequence to the father than all his property; and in the joy that he was penitent and was safe, he forgot his ingratitude and folly. So should the older son have done.