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Luke 18:7

    Luke 18:7 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And shall not God avenge his own elect, which cry day and night unto him, though he bear long with them?

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And shall not God avenge his own elect, which cry day and night to him, though he bear long with them?

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And shall not God avenge his elect, that cry to him day and night, and yet he is longsuffering over them?

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And will not God do right in the cause of his saints, whose cries come day and night to his ears, though he is long in doing it?

    Webster's Revision

    And shall not God avenge his elect, that cry to him day and night, and yet he is longsuffering over them?

    World English Bible

    Won't God avenge his chosen ones, who are crying out to him day and night, and yet he exercises patience with them?

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And shall not God avenge his elect, which cry to him day and night, and he is longsuffering over them?

    Clarke's Commentary on Luke 18:7

    And shall not God avenge his own elect - And will not God the righteous Judge do justice for his chosen? Probably this may refer to the cruel usage which his disciples had met with, and were still receiving, from the disobedient and unbelieving Jews; and which should be finally visited upon them in the destruction of their city, and the calamities which should follow. But we may consider the text as having a more extensive meaning. As God has graciously promised to give salvation to every soul that comes unto him through his Son, and has put his Spirit in their hearts, inducing them to cry unto him incessantly for it; the goodness of his nature and the promise of his grace bind him to hear the prayers they offer unto him, and to grant them all that salvation which he has led them by his promise and Spirit to request.

    Which cry day and night unto him, etc. - This is a genuine characteristic of the true elect or disciples of Christ. They feel they have neither light, power, nor goodness, but as they receive them from him; and, as he is the desire of their soul, they incessantly seek that they may be upheld and saved by him.

    Though he bear long with them? - Rather, and He is compassionate towards Them, and consequently not at all like to the unrighteous judge. Instead of μακροθυμων, and be long-suffering, as in our translation, I read μακροθυμει, he is compassionate, which reading is supported by ABDLQ, and several others. The reason which our Lord gives for the success of his chosen, is,

    1. They cry unto him day and night.

    2. He is compassionate towards Them.

    In consequence of the first, they might expect justice even from an unrighteous judge; and, in consequence of the second, they are sure of salvation, because they ask it from that God who is towards them a Father of eternal love and compassion. There was little reason to expect justice from the unrighteous judge.

    1. Because he was unrighteous; and

    2. Because he had no respect for man: no, not even for a poor desolate widow.

    But there is all the reason under heaven to expect mercy from God:

    1. Because he is righteous, and he has promised it; and

    2. Because he is compassionate towards his creatures; being ever prone to give more than the most enlarged heart can request of him.

    Every reader must perceive that the common translation is so embarrassed as to be almost unintelligible; while that in this note, from the above authorities, is as plain as possible, and shows this beautiful parable to be one of the most invaluable pieces in the word of God.

    Barnes' Notes on Luke 18:7

    Shall not God avenge ... - We are not to suppose that the character of God is at all represented by this judge, or that "his" principles of conduct are at all like those of the judge. This parable shows us conclusively that many "circumstances" of a parable are not to be interpreted closely: they are mere appendages to the narrative. The great truth which our Saviour "designed" to teach is what we ought to endeavor to find. In this case there can be no doubt what that truth is. He has himself told us that it is, that "men ought always to pray and not to faint." This he teaches by the example in the parable; and the argument which it implies is this:

    1. A poor widow, by her perseverance only, obtained from an unjust man what otherwise she would "not" have obtained.

    2. God is not unjust. He is good, and disposed to do justice and to bestow mercy.

    If, therefore, this "wicked man" by persevering prayer was induced to do justice, how much more shall "God," who is good, and who is not actuated by any such selfish and base principles, do justice to them who apply to him!

    Avenge - Do justice to or vindicate them. This may have a twofold reference.

    1. To the disciples in the time of Jesus, who were about to be oppressed and persecuted, and over whom calamities were about to come, "as if" God did not regard their cries and had forsaken them. To them Jesus gives the assurance that God "would" hear their petitions and come forth to vindicate them; and that, notwithstanding all these calamities, he would yet appear for their deliverance.

    2. It may have a more "general" meaning. The people of God are often oppressed, calumniated, persecuted. They are few in number and feeble. They seem to be almost forsaken and cast down, and their enemies triumph. Yet in due time God will hear their prayers, and will come forth for their vindication. And even if it should not be "in this life," yet he will do it in the day of judgment, when he will pronounce them blessed, and receive them forever to himself.

    His own elect - People of God, saints, Christians; so called because God has "chosen" them to be his. The term is usually given in the Scriptures to the true followers of God, and is a term of affection, denoting his great and special love in choosing them out of a world of sinners, and conferring on them grace, and mercy, and eternal life. See 1 Thessalonians 1:4; Colossians 3:12; 1 Peter 1:2; Ephesians 1:4. It signifies here that they are especially dear to him; that he feels a deep interest in their welfare, and that he will, therefore, be ready to come forth to their aid. The judge felt no special interest in that widow, yet he heard her; God feels a particular regard, a tender love for his elect, and, therefore, he will hear and save.

    Which cry day and night - This expresses one striking characteristic of the elect of God; they pray, and pray constantly. No one can have evidence that he is chosen of God who is not a man of prayer. One of the best marks by which the electing love of God is known is that it disposes us to pray. This passage supposes that when the elect of God are in trouble and pressed down with calamities, they "will" cry unto him; and it affirms that if they do, he will hear their cries and answer their requests.

    Though he bear long with them - This passage has been variously interpreted, and there is some variety of reading in the manuscripts. Some read, "Will not God avenge his elect? Will he linger in their cause?" But the most natural meaning is, "Although he defers long to avenge them, and greatly tries their patience, yet he will avenge them." He tries their faith; he suffers their persecutions and trials to continue a long time; and it almost "appears" as if he would not interpose. Yet he will do it, and will save them.

    Wesley's Notes on Luke 18:7

    18:7 And shall not God - The most just Judge, vindicate his own elect - Preserve the Christians from all their adversaries, and in particular save them out of the general destruction, and avenge them of the Jews? Though he bear long with them - Though he does not immediately put an end, either to the wrongs of the wicked, or the sufferings of good men.

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