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Luke 19:12

    Luke 19:12 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    He said therefore, A certain nobleman went into a far country to receive for himself a kingdom, and to return.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    He said therefore, A certain nobleman went into a far country to receive for himself a kingdom, and to return.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    He said therefore, A certain nobleman went into a far country, to receive for himself a kingdom, and to return.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    So he said, A certain man of high birth went into a far-away country to get a kingdom for himself, and to come back.

    Webster's Revision

    He said therefore, A certain nobleman went into a far country, to receive for himself a kingdom, and to return.

    World English Bible

    He said therefore, "A certain nobleman went into a far country to receive for himself a kingdom, and to return.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    He said therefore, A certain nobleman went into a far country, to receive for himself a kingdom, and to return.

    Clarke's Commentary on Luke 19:12

    A certain nobleman - In the following parable there are two distinct morals intended; let it be viewed in these two points of light. 1. The behavior of the citizens to the nobleman; and, 2. The behavior of his own servants to him.

    1. By the behavior of the citizens, and their punishment, (Luke 19:14, Luke 19:27), we are taught that the Jews, who were the people of Christ, would reject him, and try to prevent his reigning over them in his spiritual kingdom, and would for that crime be severely punished by the destruction of their state. And this moral is all that answers to the introductory words, Luke 19:11. And they thought that the kingdom of God should immediately appear.

    2. The other moral extends itself through the whole of the parable, viz. that the disciples of Christ, who are his servants; and who made a good improvement of the favors granted them by the Gospel, should be rewarded in proportion to the improvement made under the means of grace. This latter moral is all that is intended by Matthew in Matthew 25:14, etc., who mentions this parable as spoken by Christ after his triumphant entry into Jerusalem; though Luke has here placed that event after the parable. See Bishop Pearce.

    The meaning of the different parts of this parable appears to be as follows.

    A certain nobleman - The Lord Jesus, who was shortly to be crucified by the Jews.

    Went into a far country - Ascended to the right hand of the Divine Majesty.

    To receive a kingdom - To take possession of the mediatorial kingdom, the right to which, as Messiah, he had acquired by his sufferings: see Philippians 2:8, Philippians 2:9; Hebrews 1:3, Hebrews 1:8, Hebrews 1:9. In these words there is an allusion to the custom of those days, when they who had kingdoms or governments given unto them went to Rome to receive that dignity from the emperors. Bishop Pearce. In proof of this, see Josephus, Ant. l. xiv. c. xiv., where we find Herod went to Rome to receive the sanction and authority of the Roman emperor. And, from lib. xvii. c. 3, we learn that his successors acted in the same way.

    And to return - To judge and punish the rebellious Jews.

    Barnes' Notes on Luke 19:12

    A certain nobleman - A prince; a man descended from kings, and having a title, therefore, to succeed in the kingdom.

    Went into a far country ... - This expression is derived from the state of things in Judea in the time of the Saviour. Judea was subject to the Romans, having been conquered by Pompey about sixty years before Christ. It was, however, governed by "Jews," who held the government "under" the Romans. It was necessary that the prince or king should receive a recognition of his right to the kingdom by the Roman emperor and, in order to this, that he should go to Rome; or, as it is said here, that he might receive to himself a kingdom. This actually occurred several times. Archelaus, a son of Herod the Great, about the time of the birth of Jesus, went to Rome to obtain a confirmation of the title which his father had left him, and succeeded in doing it. Herod the Great, his father, had done the same thing before to secure the aid and countenance of Antony. Agrippa the younger, grandson of Herod the Great, went to Rome also to obtain the favor of Tiberius, and to be confirmed in his government. Such instances, having frequently occurred, would make this parable perfectly intelligible to those to whom it was addressed. By the nobleman, here, is undoubtedly represented the Messiah, the Lord Jesus Christ; by his going into a far country is denoted his going to heaven, to the right hand of his Father, "before" he should "fully" set up his kingdom and establish his reign among men.

    Wesley's Notes on Luke 19:12

    19:12 He went into a far country to receive a kingdom - Christ went to heaven, to receive his sovereign power as wan, even all authority in heaven and earth. Mt 25:14; Mr 13:34.