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Luke 19:14

    Luke 19:14 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    But his citizens hated him, and sent a message after him, saying, We will not have this man to reign over us.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    But his citizens hated him, and sent a message after him, saying, We will not have this man to reign over us.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    But his citizens hated him, and sent an ambassage after him, saying, We will not that this man reign over us.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    But his people had no love for him, and sent representatives after him, saying, We will not have this man for our ruler.

    Webster's Revision

    But his citizens hated him, and sent an ambassage after him, saying, We will not that this man reign over us.

    World English Bible

    But his citizens hated him, and sent an envoy after him, saying, 'We don't want this man to reign over us.'

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    But his citizens hated him, and sent an ambassage after him, saying, We will not that this man reign over us.

    Clarke's Commentary on Luke 19:14

    His citizens - Or countrymen - the Jewish people, who professed to be subjects of the kingdom of God.

    Hated him - Despised him for the meanness of his birth, his crucifixion to the world, and for the holiness of his doctrine. Neither mortification nor holiness suits the dispositions of the carnal mind.

    Sent a message after him - As, in Luke 19:12, there is an allusion to a person's going to Rome, when elected to be ruler of a province or kingdom, to receive that dignity from the hand of the emperor, so it is here intimated that, after the person went to receive this dignity, some of the discontented citizens took the opportunity to send an embassy to the emperor, to prevent him from establishing the object of their hatred in the government.

    We will not have this man, etc. - The Jews rejected Jesus Christ, would not submit to his government, and, a short time after this, preferred even a murderer to him. Like cleaves to like. No wonder that those who murdered the Lord of glory should prefer a murderer, one of their own temper, to the Redeemer of their souls.

    Barnes' Notes on Luke 19:14

    But his citizens - His "subjects," or the people whom he was desirous of ruling.

    Hated him - On account of his character, and their fear of oppression. This was, in fact, the case with regard to Archelaus, the Jewish prince, who went to Rome to be confirmed in his kingdom.

    Sent a message, saying ... - His discontented subjects, fearing what would be the character of his reign, sent an embassy to remonstrate against his being appointed as the ruler. This actually took place. Archelaus went to Rome to obtain from Augustus a confirmation of his title to reign over that part of Judea which had been left him by his father, Herod the Great. The Jews, knowing his character (compare Matthew 2:22), sent an embassy of 50 men to Rome, to prevail on Augustus "not" to confer the title on him, but they could not succeed. He "received" the kingdom, and reigned in Judea in the place of his father. As this fact was "fresh" in the memory of the Jews, it makes this parable much more striking. By this part of it Christ designed to denote that the Jews would reject "him" - the Messiah, and would say that they did not desire him to reign over them. See John 1:11. So it is true of all sinners that they do not "wish" Jesus to reign over them, and, if it were possible, would cast him off, and never submit to his reign.

    Wesley's Notes on Luke 19:14

    19:14 But his citizens - Such were those of Jerusalem, hated him, and sent an embassy after him - The word seems to imply, their sending ambassadors to a superior court, to enter their protest against his being admitted to the regal power. In such a solemn manner did the Jews protest, as it were, before God, that Christ should not reign over them: this man - So they call him in contempt.