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Luke 22:3

    Luke 22:3 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Then entered Satan into Judas surnamed Iscariot, being of the number of the twelve.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Then entered Satan into Judas surnamed Iscariot, being of the number of the twelve.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And Satan entered into Judas who was called Iscariot, being of the number of the twelve.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And Satan came into Judas Iscariot, who was one of the twelve.

    Webster's Revision

    And Satan entered into Judas who was called Iscariot, being of the number of the twelve.

    World English Bible

    Satan entered into Judas, who was surnamed Iscariot, who was numbered with the twelve.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And Satan entered into Judas who was called Iscariot, being of the number of the twelve.

    Definitions for Luke 22:3

    Satan - Adversary.

    Clarke's Commentary on Luke 22:3

    Then entered Satan into Judas - The devil filled the heart of Judas with avarice; and that infamous passion led him to commit the crime here specified. This at once accounts for the whole of this most unprincipled and unnatural transaction. None but a devil, or he who is possessed by one, could have been guilty of it: - let the living lay this to heart. A minister of the Gospel, who is a lover of money, is constantly betraying the interests of Christ. He cannot serve two masters; and while his heart is possessed with the love of self, the love of God and zeal for perishing souls cannot dwell in him. What Satan could not do by the envy and malice of the high priests and Pharisees, he effects by Judas, a false and fallen minister of the Gospel of God. None are so dangerous to the interests of Christianity as persons of this stamp.

    Barnes' Notes on Luke 22:3

    Then entered Satan into Judas - It is not necessary to suppose that Satan entered personally into the body of Judas, but only that he brought him under his influence; he filled his mind with an evil passion, and led him on to betray his Master. The particular passion of which Satan made use was "avarice" - probably the besetting sin of Judas. To show its exceeding evil and baseness, it is only necessary to say that when it produced its "appropriate" effect in this case, it led to the betraying and crucifixion of the Son of God. We may learn, also, that when Satan "tempts" people, he commonly does it by exciting and raising to the highest pitch their native passions. He does not make them act contrary to their nature, but leads them on to "act out" their proper disposition.

    Satan - This word properly means an adversary or an accuser. It is the name which in the Scriptures is commonly given to the prince or leader of evil spirits, and is given to him because he is the "accuser or calumniator" of the righteous (see Revelation 12:10; compare Job 1:6-9), as well as because he is the "adversary" of God.

    Being of the number of the twelve - One of the twelve apostles. This greatly aggravated his crime. He should have been bound by most tender ties to Jesus. He was one of his family - long with him, and, treated by him with every mark of kindness and confidence; and nothing could more enhance his guilt than thus to make use of this confidence for the commission of one of the basest crimes.

    Wesley's Notes on Luke 22:3

    22:3 Then entered Satan - Who is never wanting to assist those whose heart is bent upon mischief.