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Luke 23:11

    Luke 23:11 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And Herod with his men of war set him at nought, and mocked him, and arrayed him in a gorgeous robe, and sent him again to Pilate.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And Herod with his men of war set him at nothing, and mocked him, and arrayed him in a gorgeous robe, and sent him again to Pilate.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And Herod with his soldiers set him at nought, and mocked him, and arraying him in gorgeous apparel sent him back to Pilate.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And Herod, with the men of his army, put shame on him and made sport of him, and dressing him in shining robes, he sent him back to Pilate.

    Webster's Revision

    And Herod with his soldiers set him at nought, and mocked him, and arraying him in gorgeous apparel sent him back to Pilate.

    World English Bible

    Herod with his soldiers humiliated him and mocked him. Dressing him in luxurious clothing, they sent him back to Pilate.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And Herod with his soldiers set him at nought, and mocked him, and arraying him in gorgeous apparel sent him back to Pilate.

    Definitions for Luke 23:11

    Nought - Nothing.

    Clarke's Commentary on Luke 23:11

    A gorgeous robe - Εσθητα λαμπραν. It probably means a white robe, for it was the custom of the Jewish nobility to wear such. Hence, in Revelation 3:4, it is said of the saints, They shall walk with me in White (garments), because they are Worthy. In such a robe, Herod, by way of mockery, caused our Lord to be clothed; but, the nobility among the Romans wearing purple for the most part, Pilate's soldiers, who were Romans, put on Jesus a purple robe, Mark 15:17; John 19:2; both of them following the custom of their own country, when, by way of mocking our Lord as a king, they clothed him in robes of state. See Bishop Pearce.

    Barnes' Notes on Luke 23:11

    Herod with his men of war - With his soldiers, or his body-guard. It is probable that in traveling he had "a guard" to attend him constantly.

    Set him at nought - Treated him with contempt and ridicule.

    A gorgeous robe - A white or shining robe, for this is the meaning of the original. The Roman princes wore "purple" robes, and "Pilate," therefore, put such a robe on Jesus. The Jewish kings wore a "white" robe, which was often rendered very shining or gorgeous by much tinsel or silver interwoven. Josephus says that the robe which Agrippa wore was so bright with silver that when the sun shone on it, it so dazzled the eyes that it was difficult to look on it. The Jews and Romans, therefore, decked him in the manner appropriate to their own country, for purposes of mockery. All this was unlawful and malicious, as there was not the least evidence of his guilt.

    Sent him to Pilate - It was by the interchange of these civilities that they were made friends. It would seem that Pilate sent him to Herod as a token of civility and respect, and with a design, perhaps, of putting an end to their quarrel. Herod returned the civility, and it resulted in their reconciliation.

    Wesley's Notes on Luke 23:11

    23:11 Herod set him at nought - Probably judging him to be a fool, because he answered nothing. In a splendid robe - In royal apparel; intimating that he feared nothing from this king.