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Luke 4:26

    Luke 4:26 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    But unto none of them was Elias sent, save unto Sarepta, a city of Sidon, unto a woman that was a widow.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    But to none of them was Elias sent, save to Sarepta, a city of Sidon, to a woman that was a widow.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    and unto none of them was Elijah sent, but only to Zarephath, in the land of Sidon, unto a woman that was a widow.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    But Elijah was not sent to one of them, but only to Zarephath, in the land of Sidon, to a woman who was a widow.

    Webster's Revision

    and unto none of them was Elijah sent, but only to Zarephath, in the land of Sidon, unto a woman that was a widow.

    World English Bible

    Elijah was sent to none of them, except to Zarephath, in the land of Sidon, to a woman who was a widow.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    and unto none of them was Elijah sent, but only to Zarephath, in the land of Sidon, unto a woman that was a widow.

    Definitions for Luke 4:26

    Save - Except; besides.

    Clarke's Commentary on Luke 4:26

    Unto none of them was Elias sent, save unto Sarepta - The sentence is elliptical, and means this: To none of them was Elias sent; he was not sent except to Sarepta; for the widow at Sarepta was a Sidonian, not a widow of Israel. Pearce. - Sarepta was a pagan city in the country of Sidon, in the vicinity of Galilee.

    Barnes' Notes on Luke 4:26

    Save unto Sarepta - Sarepta was a town between Tyre and Sidon, near the Mediterranean Sea. It was not a "Jewish" city, but a Sidonian, and therefore a "Gentile" town. The word "save" in this verse does not express the meaning of the original. It would seem to imply that the city was Jewish. The meaning of the verse is this: "He was sent to none of the widows in Israel. He was not sent except to Sarepta, to a woman that was a "Sidonian." Dr. Thomson ("The Land and the Book," vol. i. p. 232-236) regards Sarepta as the modern Sarafend. He says that the ruins have been frequently dug over for stone to build the barracks at Beirut, and that the broken columns, marble slabs, sarcophagi, and other ruins indicate that it was once a flourishing city. A large town was built there in the time of the Crusades.