Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

Luke 6:29

    Luke 6:29 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And unto him that smiteth thee on the one cheek offer also the other; and him that taketh away thy cloak forbid not to take thy coat also.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And to him that smites you on the one cheek offer also the other; and him that takes away your cloak forbid not to take your coat also.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    To him that smiteth thee on the one cheek offer also the other; and from him that taketh away thy cloak withhold not thy coat also.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    If a man gives you a blow on one side of your face, then let the other side be turned to him; from him who takes away your coat, do not keep back your robe.

    Webster's Revision

    To him that smiteth thee on the one cheek offer also the other; and from him that taketh away thy cloak withhold not thy coat also.

    World English Bible

    To him who strikes you on the cheek, offer also the other; and from him who takes away your cloak, don't withhold your coat also.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    To him that smiteth thee on the one cheek offer also the other; and from him that taketh away thy cloke withhold not thy coat also.

    Definitions for Luke 6:29

    Cloak - Raiment; clothing.

    Clarke's Commentary on Luke 6:29

    Thy cloak - thy coat - In Matthew 5:40, I have said that Coat, χιτωνα, signifies under garment, or strait coat; and Cloak, ἱματιον, means upper garment, or great coat. This interpretation is confirmed by the following observations of Bishop Pearce. The χιτων was a tunica, or vestcoat, over which the Jews and other nations threw an outer coat, or gown, called a cloak, Matthew 5:40, (which is meant by ἱματιον), when they went abroad, or were not at work. Hence the common people at Rome, who did not usually wear, or had no right to wear, the toga, are called by Horace tunicatus popellus, Epist. i. 7, 65. This account of the difference between the χιτων and the ἱματιον appears plainly from what Maximus Tyrius says, The inner garment which is over the body they call χιτωνισκον, and the outer one the ἱματιον. And so Plutarch, (in Nupt. p. 139, ed. Fran. 1620), speaking of a man who felt the heat of the sun too much for him, says that he put off, τον χιτωνα, τῳ ἰματιῳ, his vestcoat also with his cloak.

    Barnes' Notes on Luke 6:29

    See Matthew 5:39-40.

    Wesley's Notes on Luke 6:29

    6:29 To him that smiteth thee on the cheek - Taketh away thy cloak - These seem to be proverbial expressions, to signify an invasion of the tenderest points of honour and property. Offer the other - Forbid not thy coat - That is, rather yield to his repeating the affront or injury, than gratify resentment in righting your self; in any method not becoming Christian love. Mt 5:39.