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Luke 7:11

    Luke 7:11 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And it came to pass the day after, that he went into a city called Nain; and many of his disciples went with him, and much people.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And it came to pass the day after, that he went into a city called Nain; and many of his disciples went with him, and much people.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And it came to pass soon afterwards, that he went to a city called Nain; and his disciples went with him, and a great multitude.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And it came about, after a little time, that he went to a town named Nain; and his disciples went with him, and a great number of people.

    Webster's Revision

    And it came to pass soon afterwards, that he went to a city called Nain; and his disciples went with him, and a great multitude.

    World English Bible

    It happened soon afterwards, that he went to a city called Nain. Many of his disciples, along with a great multitude, went with him.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And it came to pass soon afterwards, that he went to a city called Nain; and his disciples went with him, and a great multitude.

    Clarke's Commentary on Luke 7:11

    Nain - A small city of Galilee, in the tribe of Issachar.

    According to Eusebius, it was two miles from Mount Tabor, southward; and near to Endor.

    Barnes' Notes on Luke 7:11

    A city called Nain - This city was in Galilee, in the boundaries of the tribe of Issachar. It was about two miles south of Mount Tabor, and not far from Capernaum; It is now a small village inhabited by Jews, Muslims, and Christians. Dr. Thomson ("The Land and the Book," vol. ii. p. 158) locates it on the northwest corner of a mount now called Jebel ed Duhy, one hour's ride from the foot of Mount Tabor. Of this place he says: "This mount is now called Jebel ed Duhy and that small hamlet on the northwest corner of it is Nain, famous for the restoration of the widow's son to life. It was once a place of considerable extent, but is now little more than a cluster of ruins, among which dwell a few families of fanatical Moslems. It is in keeping with the one historic incident that renders it dear to the Christian, that its only antiquities are tombs. These are situated mainly on the east of the village, and it was in that direction, I presume, that the widow's son was being carried on that memorable occasion. It took me just an hour to ride from the foot of Tabor to Nain."