Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

Luke 7:42

    Luke 7:42 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And when they had nothing to pay, he frankly forgave them both. Tell me therefore, which of them will love him most?

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And when they had nothing to pay, he frankly forgave them both. Tell me therefore, which of them will love him most?

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    When they had not wherewith to pay, he forgave them both. Which of them therefore will love him most?

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    When they were unable to make payment, he made the two of them free of their debts. Which of them, now, will have the greater love for him?

    Webster's Revision

    When they had not wherewith to pay, he forgave them both. Which of them therefore will love him most?

    World English Bible

    When they couldn't pay, he forgave them both. Which of them therefore will love him most?"

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    When they had not wherewith to pay, he forgave them both. Which of them therefore will love him most?

    Definitions for Luke 7:42

    Tell - To number; count.

    Clarke's Commentary on Luke 7:42

    Which of them will love him most? - Which is under the greater obligation and should love him most?

    Barnes' Notes on Luke 7:42

    Frankly forgave - Freely forgave, or forgave entirely without any compensation. This is not designed to express anything about the way in which God forgives sinners. He forgives - forgives freely, but it is in connection with the "atonement" made by the Lord Jesus. If it was a mere "debt" which we owed to God, he might forgive, as this creditor did, without an equivalent. But it is "crime" which he forgives. He pardons as a moral governor. A parent might forgive a "debt" without any equivalent; but he cannot pardon an offending child without regarding his own "character" as a parent, the "truth" of his threatenings, the good order of his house, and the maintenance of his authority. So our sins against God, though they are called "debts," are called so "figuratively." It is not an affair of "money," and God cannot forgive us without maintaining his word, the honor of his government, and law - in other words, without an "atonement." It is clear that by the creditor here our Saviour meant to designate God, and by the "debtors," sinners and the woman present. Simon, whose life had been comparatively upright, was denoted by the one that owed "fifty" pence; the woman, who had been an open and shameless sinner, was represented by the one that owed "five hundred." Yet "neither" could pay. Both must be forgiven or perish. So, however much difference there is among people, "all" need the pardoning mercy of God, and "all," without that, must perish.