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Mark 12:44

    Mark 12:44 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    For all they did cast in of their abundance; but she of her want did cast in all that she had, even all her living.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    For all they did cast in of their abundance; but she of her want did cast in all that she had, even all her living.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    for they all did cast in of their superfluity; but she of her want did cast in all that she had, even all her living.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Because they all put in something out of what they had no need for; but she out of her need put in all she had, even all her living.

    Webster's Revision

    for they all did cast in of their superfluity; but she of her want did cast in all that she had, even all her living.

    World English Bible

    for they all gave out of their abundance, but she, out of her poverty, gave all that she had to live on."

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    for they all did cast in of their superfluity; but she of her want did cast in all that she had, even all her living.

    Definitions for Mark 12:44

    Cast - Worn-out; old; cast-off.

    Barnes' Notes on Mark 12:44

    Of their abundance - Of their superfluous store. They have given what they did not "need." They could afford it as well as not, and in doing it they have shown no self-denial.

    She of her want - Of her poverty.

    All her living - All that she had to live on. She trusted in God to supply her wants, and devoted her little property entirely to him. From this passage we may learn:

    1. That God is pleased with offerings made to him and his cause.

    2. That it is our duty to devote our property to God. We received it from him, and we shall not employ it in a proper manner unless we feel that we are stewards, and ask of him what we shall do with it. Jesus approved the conduct of all who had given money to the treasury.

    3. That the highest evidence of love to the cause of religion is not the "amount" given, but the amount compared with our means.

    4. That it "may be" proper to give "all" our property to God, and to depend on his providence for the supply of our wants.

    5. That God does not despise the humblest offering, if made in sincerity. He loves a cheerful giver.

    6. That there are none who may not in this way show their love to the cause of religion. There are few, very few students in Sunday Schools who may not give as much to the cause of religion as this poor widow; and Jesus would be as ready to approve their offerings as he was hers: and the time to "begin" to be benevolent and to do good is in early life, in childhood.

    7. That it is every man's duty to inquire, not how much he gives, but how much compared with what he has; how much self-denial he practices, and what is the "motive" with which it is done.

    8. We may remark that few practice self-denial for the purpose of charity. Most give of their abundance - that is, what they can spare without feeling it, and many feel that this is the same as throwing it away. Among all the thousands who give to these objects, how few deny themselves of one comfort, even the least, that they may advance the kingdom of Christ!