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Mark 14:36

    Mark 14:36 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And he said, Abba, Father, all things are possible unto thee; take away this cup from me: nevertheless not what I will, but what thou wilt.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And he said, Abba, Father, all things are possible to you; take away this cup from me: nevertheless not what I will, but what you will.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And he said, Abba, Father, all things are possible unto thee; remove this cup from me: howbeit not what I will, but what thou wilt.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And he said, Abba, Father, all things are possible to you; take away this cup from me: but even so let not my pleasure, but yours be done.

    Webster's Revision

    And he said, Abba, Father, all things are possible unto thee; remove this cup from me: howbeit not what I will, but what thou wilt.

    World English Bible

    He said, "Abba, Father, all things are possible to you. Please remove this cup from me. However, not what I desire, but what you desire."

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And he said, Abba, Father, all things are possible unto thee; remove this cup from me: howbeit not what I will, but what thou wilt.

    Definitions for Mark 14:36

    Abba - Aramaic/Hebrew for "father".

    Clarke's Commentary on Mark 14:36

    Abba, Father - This Syriac word, which intimates filial affection and respect, and parental tenderness, seems to have been used by our blessed Lord merely considered as man, to show his complete submission to his Father's will, and the tender affection which he was conscious his Father had for him, Abba, Syriac, is here joined to ὁ πατηρ, Greek, both signifying father; so St. Paul, Romans 8:15; Galatians 4:6. The reason is, that from the time in which the Jews became conversant with the Greek language, by means of the Septuagint version and their commerce with the Roman and Greek provinces, they often intermingled Greek and Roman words with their own language. There is the fullest evidence of this fact in the earliest writings of the Jews; and they often add a word of the same meaning in Greek to their own term; such as מרי קירי, Mori, κυριε my Lord, Lord; פילי שער, pili, πυλη, shuar, gate, gate: and above, אבא, πατηρ, father, father: see several examples in Schoettgen. The words אבי and אבא appear to have been differently used among the Hebrews; the first Abbi, was a term of civil respect; the second, Abba, a term of filial affection. Hence, Abba, Abbi, as in the Syriac version in this place, may be considered as expressing, My Lord, my Father. And in this sense St. Paul is to be understood in the places referred to above. See Lightfoot.

    Barnes' Notes on Mark 14:36

    Ἀββα Abba This word denotes "father." It is a Syriac word, and is used by the Saviour as a word denoting filial affection and tenderness. Compare Romans 8:15.

    Wesley's Notes on Mark 14:36

    14:36 Abba, Father - St. Mark seems to add the word Father, by way of explication.