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Matthew 10:10

    Matthew 10:10 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Nor scrip for your journey, neither two coats, neither shoes, nor yet staves: for the workman is worthy of his meat.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Nor money for your journey, neither two coats, neither shoes, nor yet staves: for the workman is worthy of his meat.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    no wallet for your journey, neither two coats, nor shoes, nor staff: for the laborer is worthy of his food.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Take no bag for your journey and do not take two coats or shoes or a stick: for the workman has a right to his food.

    Webster's Revision

    no wallet for your journey, neither two coats, nor shoes, nor staff: for the laborer is worthy of his food.

    World English Bible

    Take no bag for your journey, neither two coats, nor shoes, nor staff: for the laborer is worthy of his food.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    no wallet for your journey, neither two coats, nor shoes, nor staff: for the labourer is worthy of his food.

    Definitions for Matthew 10:10

    Meat - Food.
    Scrip - Bag; sack; wallet.
    Staves - Rods; clubs.

    Clarke's Commentary on Matthew 10:10

    Nor scrip for your journey - To carry provisions. This was called תורמיל tormil, by the rabbins; it was a leathern pouch hung about their necks, in which they put their victuals. This was properly, the shepherd's bag.

    Neither two coats, etc. - Nothing to encumber you.

    Nor yet staves - Ραβδον, a staff, as in the margin, but, instead of ραβδον, staff, which is the common reading, all the following MSS. and versions have ραβδους, staves, and CEFGKLMPS. V. ninety-three others, Coptic, Armenian, latter Syriac, one of the Itala, Chrysostom, and Theophylact. This reading is of great importance, as it reconciles this place with Luke 9:3, and removes the seeming contradiction from Mark 6:8; as if he had said: "Ye shall take nothing to defend yourselves with, because ye are the servants of the Lord, and are to be supported by his bounty, and defended by his power. In a word, be like men in haste, and eager to begin the important work of the ministry. The sheep are lost-ruined: Satan is devouring them: give all diligence to pluck them out of the jaws of the destroyer."

    The workman is worthy of his meat - Της τροφης αυτου, of his maintenance. It is a maintenance, and that only, which a minister of God is to expect, and that he has a Divine right to; but not to make a fortune, or lay up wealth: besides, it is the workman, he that labors in the word and doctrine, that is to get even this. How contrary to Christ is it for a man to have vast revenues, as a minister of the Gospel, who ministers no Gospel, and who spends the revenues of the Church to its disgrace and ruin!

    Barnes' Notes on Matthew 10:10

    Nor scrip - That is, knapsack.

    This was made of skin or coarse cloth, to carry provisions in. It was commonly hung around the neck.

    Neither two coats - See the notes at Matthew 5:40.

    Neither shoes - The original is the word commonly rendered sandals. See the notes at Matthew 3:11.

    Mark says, in recording this discourse, "but be shod with sandals." Between him and Matthew there is an apparent contradiction, but there is really no difference. According to Matthew, Jesus does not forbid their "wearing" the sandals which they probably had on, but only forbids their "supplying themselves with more," or with "superfluous ones." Instead of making provision for their feet when their "present" shoes were worn out, they were to trust to Providence to be supplied, and "go as they were." The meaning of the two evangelists may be thus expressed: "Do not procure anything more for your journey than you have on. Go as you are, shod with sandals, without making any more preparation."

    Nor yet staves - In the margin, in all the ancient versions, and in the common Greek text, this is in the singular number - "nor yet" a staff. But Mark says that they might have a "staff:" "Jesus commanded them that they should take nothing for their journey, save a staff only." To many this would appear to be a contradiction. Yet the "spirit" of the instruction, the main thing that the writers aim at, is the same. That was, that they were "to go just as they were, to trust to Providence, and not to spend any time in making preparation for their journey. Some of them, probably, when he addressed them, "had staves," and some had not. To those who "had," he did not say that they should throw them away, as the instructions he was giving them might seem to require, but he suffered them to take them (Mark). To those who had not, he said they should not spend time in procuring them (Matthew), but "they were all to go just as they were."

    The workman is worthy of his meat - This implies that they were to expect a proper supply for their needs from those who were benefited. They were not to make "bargain and sale" of the power of working miracles, but they were to expect competent support from preaching the gospel, and that not merely as a gift, but because they were "worthy" of it, and had a right to it.

    Wesley's Notes on Matthew 10:10

    10:10 Neither scrip - That is, a wallet, or bag to hold provisions: Nor yet a staff - We read, Mark 6:8, Take nothing, save a staff only. He that had one might take it; they that had none, might not provide any. For the workman is worthy of his maintenance - The word includes all that is mentioned in the 9th and 10th verse s; Mt 10:9,10 all that they were forbidden to provide for themselves, so far as it was needful for them. Luke 10:7.