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Matthew 10:24

    Matthew 10:24 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    The disciple is not above his master, nor the servant above his lord.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    The disciple is not above his master, nor the servant above his lord.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    A disciple is not above his teacher, nor a servant above his lord.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    A disciple is not greater than his master, or a servant than his lord.

    Webster's Revision

    A disciple is not above his teacher, nor a servant above his lord.

    World English Bible

    "A disciple is not above his teacher, nor a servant above his lord.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    A disciple is not above his master, nor a servant above his lord.

    Clarke's Commentary on Matthew 10:24

    The disciple is not above his master - Or in plainer terms, A scholar is not above his teacher. The saying itself requires no comment, its truth and reasonableness are self-evident, but to the spirit and design we should carefully attend. Jesus is the great teacher: we profess to be his scholars. He who keeps the above saying in his heart will never complain of what he suffers. How many irregular thoughts and affections is this maxim capable of restraining! A man is not a scholar of Christ unless he learn his doctrine; and he does not learn it as he ought unless he put it in practice.

    Barnes' Notes on Matthew 10:24

    The disciple is not above his master ... - That is, you must expect the same treatment which I have received. They have called me, your Master and Teacher, Beelzebub, the prince of the devils (see Matthew 12:24; Luke 11:15; John 8:48), and you must expect that they will call all of the family by the same name. "Beelzebub" was a god of the Ekronites. See 2 Kings 1:2. The word literally means "the god of flies," so called because this idol was supposed to protect them from the numerous swarms of flies with which that country abounded. The correct reading here, as in Luke 11:15, Luke 11:18-19; Mark 3:22, is supposed to be, not "Beelzebub," but "Beelzebul" (Griesbach, Hahn, Robinson, Lexicon) an Aramean form of the word meaning the "god of dung" or "filth." The name, thus altered by the Jews by changing a single letter, was given to Satan to express supreme contempt and aversion. The Jews seem to have first given to Satan the name of a pagan god, and then, to express their sense of the character of Satan, to have changed that name by altering a single letter so as to express their aversion in the most emphatic manner. By giving the name to Christ, they poured upon him the greatest possible abuse and contempt.

    Wesley's Notes on Matthew 10:24

    10:24 Luke 6:30; John 15:20.