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Matthew 11:14

    Matthew 11:14 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And if ye will receive it, this is Elias, which was for to come.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And if you will receive it, this is Elias, which was for to come.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And if ye are willing to receive it, this is Elijah, that is to come.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And if you are able to see it, this is Elijah who was to come.

    Webster's Revision

    And if ye are willing to receive it, this is Elijah, that is to come.

    World English Bible

    If you are willing to receive it, this is Elijah, who is to come.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And if ye are willing to receive it, this is Elijah, which is to come.

    Clarke's Commentary on Matthew 11:14

    This is Elias, which was for to come - This should always be written Elijah, that as strict a conformity as possible might be kept up between the names in the Old Testament and the New. The Prophet Malachi, who predicted the coming of the Baptist in the spirit and power of Elijah, gave the three following distinct characteristics of him. First, That he should be the forerunner and messenger of the Messiah: Behold I send my messenger before me, Malachi 3:1. Secondly, That he should appear before the destruction of the second temple: Even the Lord whom ye seek shall suddenly come to his temple, ibid. Thirdly, That he should preach repentance to the Jews; and that, some time after, the great and terrible day of the Lord should come, and the Jewish land be smitten with a curse, Malachi 4:5, Malachi 4:6. Now these three characters agree perfectly with the conduct of the Baptist, and what shortly followed his preaching, and have not been found in any one else; which is a convincing proof that Jesus was the promised Messiah.

    Barnes' Notes on Matthew 11:14

    If ye will receive it - This is a mode of speaking implying that the doctrine which he was about to state was different from their common views; that he was about to state something which varied from the common expectation, and which therefore they might be disposed to reject.

    This is Elias ... - That is, "Elijah." Elias is the "Greek" mode of writing the Hebrew word "Elijah." An account of him is found in the first and second books of Kings. He was a distinguished prophet, and was taken up to heaven in a chariot of fire, 2 Kings 2:11. The prophet Malachi Mal 4:5-6 predicted that "Elijah" would be sent before the coming of the Messiah to prepare the way for him. By this was evidently meant, not that he should appear "in person," but that one should appear with a striking resemblance to him; or, as Luke Luk 1:17 expresses it, "in the spirit and power of Elijah." But the Jews understood it differently. They supposed that Elijah would appear in person. They also supposed that Jeremiah and some other of the prophets would appear also to usher in the promised Messiah and to grace his advent. See Matthew 16:14; Matthew 17:10; John 1:21. This prevalent belief was the reason why he used the words "if ye will receive it," implying that the affirmation that "John" was the promised Elijah was a doctrine contrary to their expectation.

    Wesley's Notes on Matthew 11:14

    11:14 Mal 4:5.