Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

Matthew 16:22

    Matthew 16:22 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Then Peter took him, and began to rebuke him, saying, Be it far from thee, Lord: this shall not be unto thee.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Then Peter took him, and began to rebuke him, saying, Be it far from you, Lord: this shall not be to you.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And Peter took him, and began to rebuke him, saying, Be it far from thee, Lord: this shall never be unto thee.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And Peter, protesting, said to him, Be it far from you, Lord; it is impossible that this will come about.

    Webster's Revision

    And Peter took him, and began to rebuke him, saying, Be it far from thee, Lord: this shall never be unto thee.

    World English Bible

    Peter took him aside, and began to rebuke him, saying, "Far be it from you, Lord! This will never be done to you."

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And Peter took him, and began to rebuke him, saying, Be it far from thee, Lord: this shall never be unto thee.

    Definitions for Matthew 16:22

    Rebuke - To reprimand; strongly warn; restrain.

    Clarke's Commentary on Matthew 16:22

    Then Peter took him - Προσλαβομενος - took him up - suddenly interrupted him, as it were calling him to order - see Wakefield. Some versions give προσλαβομενος the sense of calling him aside. The word signifies also to receive in a friendly manner - to embrace; but Mr. Wakefield's translation agrees better with the scope of the place. A man like Peter, who is of an impetuous spirit, and decides without consideration upon every subject, must of necessity be often in the wrong.

    Be it far from thee Lord - Ιλεως σοι Κυριε. Be merciful to thyself Lord. Pity thyself - So I think the original should be rendered. Peter knew that Christ had power sufficient to preserve himself from all the power and malice of the Jews; and wished him to exert that in his own behalf which he had often exorted in the behalf of others. Some critics of great note think the expression elliptical, and that the word Θεος, God, is necessarily understood, as if Peter had said, God be merciful to thee! but I think the marginal reading is the sense of the passage. The French, Italian, and Spanish, render it the same way. Blind and ignorant man is ever finding fault with the conduct of God. Human reason cannot comprehend the incarnation of the Almighty's fellow, (Zechariah 13:7), nor reconcile the belief of his divinity with his sufferings and death. How many Peters are there now in the world, who are in effect saying, This cannot be done unto thee - thou didst not give thy life for the sin of the world - it would be injustice to cause the innocent to suffer thus for the guilty. But what saith God? His soul shall be made an offering for sin - he shall taste death for every man - the iniquities of us all were laid upon him. Glorious truth! May the God who published it have eternal praises!

    Barnes' Notes on Matthew 16:22

    Then Peter took him - This may mean either that he interrupted him, or that he took him aside, or that he took him by the hand as a friend.

    This latter is probably the true meaning. Peter was strongly attached to him. He could not bear to think of Jesus' death. He expected, moreover, that he would be the triumphant Messiah. In his ardor, and confidence, and strong attachment, he seized him by the hand as a friend, and said, "Be it far from thee." This phrase might have been translated, "God be merciful to thee; this shall not be unto thee." It expressed Peter's strong desire that it might not be. The word "rebuke" here means to admonish or earnestly to entreat, as in Luke 17:3. It does not mean that Peter assumed authority over Christ, but that he earnestly expressed his wish that it might not be so. Even this was improper. He should have been submissive, and not have interfered.