Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

Matthew 18:31

    Matthew 18:31 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    So when his fellowservants saw what was done, they were very sorry, and came and told unto their lord all that was done.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    So when his fellow servants saw what was done, they were very sorry, and came and told to their lord all that was done.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    So when his fellow-servants saw what was done, they were exceeding sorry, and came and told unto their lord all that was done.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    So when the other servants saw what was done they were very sad, and came and gave word to their lord of what had been done.

    Webster's Revision

    So when his fellow-servants saw what was done, they were exceeding sorry, and came and told unto their lord all that was done.

    World English Bible

    So when his fellow servants saw what was done, they were exceedingly sorry, and came and told to their lord all that was done.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    So when his fellow-servants saw what was done, they were exceeding sorry, and came and told unto their lord all that was done.

    Clarke's Commentary on Matthew 18:31

    His fellow-servants saw what was done - An act of this kind is so dishonorable to all the followers of Christ, and to the spirit of his Gospel, that through the respect they owe to their Lord and Master, and through the concern they feel for the prosperity of his cause, they are obliged to plead against it at the throne of God.

    Barnes' Notes on Matthew 18:31

    So when his fellow-servants ... - This is a mere circumstance thrown into the story for the sake of keeping, or making a consistent narrative. It cannot be intended to teach that other Christians should go and tell God what a brother has done; for God well knows all the actions of his children, and does not need us surely to inform him of what is done. It is abusing the Bible, and departing from the design of parables, to press every circumstance, and to endeavor to extract from it some spiritual meaning. Our Saviour, in this parable, designed most clearly to exhibit only one great truth - the duty of forgiving our brethren, and the great evil of not forgiving a brother when he offends us. The circumstances of the parable are intended only to make the story consistent with itself, and thus to impress the general truth more fully on the mind.