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Matthew 22:2

    Matthew 22:2 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    The kingdom of heaven is like unto a certain king, which made a marriage for his son,

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    The kingdom of heaven is like to a certain king, which made a marriage for his son,

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    The kingdom of heaven is likened unto a certain king, who made a marriage feast for his son,

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    The kingdom of heaven is like a certain king, who made a feast when his son was married,

    Webster's Revision

    The kingdom of heaven is likened unto a certain king, who made a marriage feast for his son,

    World English Bible

    "The Kingdom of Heaven is like a certain king, who made a marriage feast for his son,

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    The kingdom of heaven is likened unto a certain king, which made a marriage feast for his son,

    Clarke's Commentary on Matthew 22:2

    The kingdom of heaven - In Bereshith Rabba, sect. 62. fol. 60, there is a parable very similar to this, and another still more so in Sohar. Levit. fol. 40. But these rabbinical parables are vastly ennobled by passing through the hands of our Lord. It appears from Luke, Luke 14:15; etc., that it was at an entertainment that this parable was originally spoken. It was a constant practice of our Lord to take the subjects of his discourses from the persons present, or from the circumstances of times, persons, and places. See Matthew 16:6; John 4:7-10; John 6:26, John 6:27; John 7:37. A preacher that can do so can never be at a loss for text or sermon.

    A marriage for his son - A marriage feast, so the word γαμους properly means. Or a feast of inauguration, when his son was put in possession of the government, and thus he and his new subjects became married together. See 1 Kings 1:5-9, 1 Kings 1:19, 1 Kings 1:25, etc., where such a feast is mentioned.

    From this parable it appears plain,

    1. That the King means the great God.

    2. His Son, the Lord Jesus.

    3. The Marriage, his incarnation, or espousing human nature, by taking it into union with himself.

    4. The Marriage Feast, the economy of the Gospel, during which men are invited to partake of the blessings purchased by, and consequent on, the incarnation and death of our blessed Lord.

    5. By those who Had Been bidden, or invited, Matthew 22:3, are meant the Jews in general, who had this union of Christ with human nature, and his sacrifice for sin, pointed out by various rites, ceremonies, and sacrifices under the law; and who, by all the prophets, had been constantly invited to believe in and receive the promised Messiah.

    6. By the Servants, we are to understand the first preachers of the Gospel, proclaiming salvation to the Jews. John the Baptist and the seventy disciples (Luke 10:1), may be here particularly intended.

    7. By the Other Servants, Matthew 22:4, the apostles seem to be meant, who, though they were to preach the Gospel to the whole world, yet were to begin at Jerusalem (Luke 24:47) with the first offers of mercy.

    8. By their making light of it, etc., Matthew 22:5, is pointed out their neglect of this salvation, and their preferring secular enjoyments, etc., to the kingdom of Christ.

    9. By injuriously using some, and slaying others, of his servants, Matthew 22:6, is pointed out the persecution raised against the apostles by the Jews, in which some of them were martyred.

    10. By sending forth his troops, Matthew 22:7, is meant the commission given to the Romans against Judea; and, burning up their city, the total destruction of Jerusalem by Titus, the son of Vespasian, which happened about forty-one years after.

    On this parable it is necessary to remark,

    continued...

    Barnes' Notes on Matthew 22:2

    The kingdom of heaven - See the notes at Matthew 3:2. The idea here is, "God deals with man in his kingdom, or in regard to the dispensation of the gospel, as a certain king did," etc. This parable refers, undoubtedly, to the rejection of the Jews and to the calling of the Gentiles. The gospel, with all its privileges, was offered to the Jewish people; but through their wickedness and pride they rejected it, and all its blessings were offered to the Gentiles and accepted. This is the general truth. Many circumstances are thrown in to fill out the narrative which cannot be particularly explained.

    A marriage for his son - Rather a "marriage-feast," or a feast on the occasion of the marriage of his son. The king here doubtless represents God providing for the salvation of the world.

    Wesley's Notes on Matthew 22:2

    22:2 A king, who made a marriage feast for his son - So did God, when he brought his first - begotten into the world.