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Matthew 26:22

    Matthew 26:22 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And they were exceeding sorrowful, and began every one of them to say unto him, Lord, is it I?

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And they were exceeding sorrowful, and began every one of them to say to him, Lord, is it I?

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And they were exceeding sorrowful, and began to say unto him every one, Is it I, Lord?

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And they were very said, and said to him, one by one, Is it I, Lord?

    Webster's Revision

    And they were exceeding sorrowful, and began to say unto him every one, Is it I, Lord?

    World English Bible

    They were exceedingly sorrowful, and each began to ask him, "It isn't me, is it, Lord?"

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And they were exceeding sorrowful, and began to say unto him every one, Is it I, Lord?

    Clarke's Commentary on Matthew 26:22

    They were exceeding sorrowful - That is, the eleven who were innocent; and the hypocritical traitor, Judas, endeavored to put on the appearance of sorrow. Strange! Did he not know that Christ knew the secrets of his soul! Or had his love of money so far blinded him, as to render him incapable of discerning even this, with which he had been before so well acquainted?

    Barnes' Notes on Matthew 26:22

    They were exceeding sorrowful - John says John 13:22 "they looked one on another, doubting of whom he spake" - that is, they anxiously looked one at another, conscious each one, except Judas, of no such intention, and each one beginning to examine himself to find whether he was the person intended.

    This showed their innocence, and their attachment to Jesus. It showed how sensitive they were to the least suspicion of the kind. It showed that they were willing to know themselves, thus evincing the spirit of the true Christian. Judas only was silent, and was the last to make the inquiry, and that after he had been plainly pointed out Matthew 26:25, thus showing:

    1. that guilt is slow to suspect itself;

    2. that it shrinks from the light;

    3. that it was his purpose to conceal his intention; and,

    4. that nothing but the consciousness that his Lord knew his design could induce him to make inquiry.

    The guilty would, if possible, always conceal their crimes. The innocent are ready to suspect that they may have done wrong. Their feelings are tender, and they inquire with solicitude whether there may not be something in their bosoms, unknown to themselves, that may be a departure from right feeling.