Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

Matthew 27:33

    Matthew 27:33 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And when they were come unto a place called Golgotha, that is to say, a place of a skull,

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And when they were come to a place called Golgotha, that is to say, a place of a skull,

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And they were come unto a place called Golgotha, that is to say, The place of a skull,

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And when they came to the place named Golgotha, that is to say, Dead Man's Head,

    Webster's Revision

    And they were come unto a place called Golgotha, that is to say, The place of a skull,

    World English Bible

    They came to a place called "Golgotha," that is to say, "The place of a skull."

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And when they were come unto a place called Golgotha, that is to say, The place of a skull,

    Clarke's Commentary on Matthew 27:33

    A place called Golgotha - From the Hebrew גלגתה or גלגלת, golgoleth, a skull, probably so called from the many skulls of these who had suffered crucifixion and other capital punishments scattered up and down in the place. It is the same as Calvary, Calvaria, i.e. calvi capitis area, the place of bare skulls. Some think the place was thus called, because it was in the form of a human skull. It is likely that it was the place of public execution, similar to the Gemoniae Scalae at Rome.

    Barnes' Notes on Matthew 27:33

    Golgotha - This is a Hebrew word, signifying the place of a skull. This is the word which in Luke is called "Calvary." The original Greek, there, also means a skull. The word "calvary" is a Latin word meaning "skull," or place of "skulls." It is not known certainly why this name was given to this place. Some have supposed that it was because the mount resembled in shape a human skull. The most probable opinion, however, is that it was a place of execution; that malefactors were beheaded there or otherwise put to death, and that their bones remained unburied or unburned. Golgotha, or Calvary, was probably a small eminence on the northwest of Jerusalem, without the walls of the city, but at a short distance. Jesus was put to death out of the city, because capital punishments were not allowed within the walls. See Numbers 15:35; 1 Kings 21:13. This was a law among the Romans as well as the Jews. He also died there, because the bodies of the beasts slain in sacrifice as typical of him were "burned without the camp." He also, as the antitype, suffered "without the gate," Hebrews 13:11-12. The place which is shown as Calvary now is within the city, and must also have been within the ancient walls, and there is no reason to suppose that it is the place where the Saviour was put to death.