Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

Matthew 27:4

    Matthew 27:4 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Saying, I have sinned in that I have betrayed the innocent blood. And they said, What is that to us? see thou to that.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Saying, I have sinned in that I have betrayed the innocent blood. And they said, What is that to us? see you to that.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    saying, I have sinned in that I betrayed innocent blood. But they said, What is that to us? see thou to it .

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Saying, I have done wrong in giving into your hands an upright man. But they said, What is that to us? it is your business.

    Webster's Revision

    saying, I have sinned in that I betrayed innocent blood. But they said, What is that to us? see thou to it .

    World English Bible

    saying, "I have sinned in that I betrayed innocent blood." But they said, "What is that to us? You see to it."

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    saying, I have sinned in that I betrayed innocent blood. But they said, What is that to us? see thou to it.

    Clarke's Commentary on Matthew 27:4

    Innocent blood - Αιμα αθωον, a Hebraism, for an innocent man. But instead of αθωον, innocent, two ancient MSS., Syriac, Vulgate, Sahidic, Armenian, and all the Itala; Origen, Cyprian, Lucifer, Ambrose, Leo, read δικαιον, righteous, or just.

    What is that to us? - What is it? - A great deal. You should immediately go and reverse the sentence you have pronounced, and liberate the innocent person. But this would have been justice, and that would have been a stranger at their tribunal.

    Barnes' Notes on Matthew 27:4

    I have sinned - I have been guilty. I have done wrong.

    In that I have betrayed the innocent blood - That is, in betraying an innocent being to death. Blood is put here for "life," or for the "man." The meaning is, that he knew and felt that Jesus was innocent. This confession is a remarkable proof that Jesus was innocent. Judas had been with him for three years. He had seen him in public and private; he had heard his public teaching and his private views; he had seen him in all circumstances; and if he had done anything evil, or advanced anything against the Roman emperor, Judas was competent to testify it. Had he known any such thing he would have stated it. His testimony, being a disciple of Jesus, would have been to the chief priests far more valuable than that of any other man; and he might not only have escaped the horrors of a troubled conscience and an awful death, but have looked for an ample reward. That he did not make such a charge that he fully and frankly confessed that Jesus was innocent - and that he gave up the ill-gotten price of treason, is full proof that, in the belief of Judas, the Saviour was free from crime, and even the suspicion of crime.

    What is that to us? - This form of speaking denoted that they had nothing to do with his remorse of conscience, and his belief that Jesus was innocent. They had secured what they wanted - the person of Jesus - and they cared little now for the feelings of the traitor. So all wicked men who make use of the agency of others for the accomplishment of crime or the gratification of passion care little for the effect on the instrument. They will soon cast him off and despise him, and in thousands of instances the instruments of villainy and the panders to the pleasures of others are abandoned to remorse, wretchedness, crime, and death.

    Wesley's Notes on Matthew 27:4

    27:4 They said, what is that to us? - How easily could they digest innocent blood! And yet they had a conscience! It is not lawful (say they) to put it into the treasury - But very lawful to slay the innocent!