Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

Matthew 6:15

    Matthew 6:15 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    But if ye forgive not men their trespasses, neither will your Father forgive your trespasses.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    But if you forgive not men their trespasses, neither will your Father forgive your trespasses.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    But if ye forgive not men their trespasses, neither will your Father forgive your trespasses.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    But if you do not let men have forgiveness for their sins, you will not have forgiveness from your Father for your sins.

    Webster's Revision

    But if ye forgive not men their trespasses, neither will your Father forgive your trespasses.

    World English Bible

    But if you don't forgive men their trespasses, neither will your Father forgive your trespasses.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    But if ye forgive not men their trespasses, neither will your Father forgive your trespasses.

    Clarke's Commentary on Matthew 6:15

    But if ye forgive not - He who does not awake at the sound of so loud a voice, is not asleep but dead. A vindictive man excludes himself from all hope of eternal life, and himself seals his own damnation.

    Trespasses - Παραπτωματα, from παρα and πιπτω, to fall off. What a remarkable difference there is between this word and οφειληματα, debts, in Matthew 6:12! Men's sins against us are only their stumblings, or fallings off from the duties they owe us; but our's are debts to God's justice, which we can never discharge. It can be no great difficulty to forgive those, especially when we consider that in many respects we have failed as much, in certain duties which we owed to others, as they have done in those which they owed us. "But I have given him no provocation." Perhaps thou art angry, and art not a proper judge in the matter; but, however it may be, it is thy interest to forgive, if thou expectest forgiveness from God. On this important subject I will subjoin an extract from Mason's Self-knowledge, page 248, 1755.

    "Athenodorus, the philosopher by reason of his old age, begged leave to retire from the court of Augustus, which the emperor granted. In his compliments of leave, he said, 'Remember, Caesar, whenever thou art angry, that thou say or do nothing before thou hast distinctly repeated to thyself the twenty-four letters of the alphabet.' On which Caesar caught him by the hand, and said, 'I have need of thy presence still:' and kept him a year longer. This was excellent advice from a heathen; but a Christian may prescribe to himself a wiser rule. When thou art angry, answer not till thou hast repeated the fifth petition of our Lord's prayer - Forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors: and our Lord's comment upon it - For if ye forgive not men their trespasses, neither will your heavenly father forgive your trespasses."

    Prayer to God is considered among the Mohammedans in a very important point of view. It is declared by the Mosliman doctors to be the corner stone of Religion, and the pillar of Faith. It is not, say they, a thing of mere form, but requires that the heart and understanding should accompany it, without which they pronounce it to be of no avail. They direct prayer to be performed five times in the twenty-four hours.

    1. Between day-break and sun-rise;

    2. Immediately after noon;

    3. Immediately before sun-set;

    4. In the evening before dark; and

    5. Before the first watch of the night.

    They hold the following points to be essentially requisite to the efficacy of prayer: -

    1. That the person be free from every species of defilement.

    2. That all sumptuous and gaudy apparel be laid aside.

    3. That the attention accompany the act, and be not suffered to wander to any other object.

    4. That the prayer be performed with the face toward the temple of Mecca. Hedayah. Prel. Dis. pp. 53, 54.

    continued...