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Matthew 9:38

    Matthew 9:38 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Pray ye therefore the Lord of the harvest, that he will send forth labourers into his harvest.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Pray you therefore the Lord of the harvest, that he will send forth laborers into his harvest.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Pray ye therefore the Lord of the harvest, that he send forth laborers into his harvest.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Make prayer, then, to the Lord of the grain-fields, that he may send out workers to get in his grain.

    Webster's Revision

    Pray ye therefore the Lord of the harvest, that he send forth laborers into his harvest.

    World English Bible

    Pray therefore that the Lord of the harvest will send out laborers into his harvest."

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Pray ye therefore the Lord of the harvest, that he send forth labourers into his harvest.

    Clarke's Commentary on Matthew 9:38

    That he will send forth laborers - Οπως εκβαλλη εργατας, that he would thrust forth laborers. Those who are fittest for the work are generally most backward to the employment. The man who is forward to become a preacher knows little of God, of human nature, or of his own heart. It is, God's province to thrust out such preachers as shall labor; and it is our duty to entreat him to do so. A minister of Christ is represented as a day-laborer: he comes into the harvest, not to become lord of it, not to live on the labor of others, but to work, and to labor his day. Though the work may be very severe, yet, to use a familiar expression, there is good wages in the harvest-home; and the day, though hot, is but a short one.

    How earnestly should the flock of Christ pray to the good Shepherd to send them pastors after his own heart, who will feed them with knowledge, and who shall be the means of spreading the knowledge of his truth and the savor of his grace over the face of the whole earth!

    The subject of fasting, already slightly noticed in the preceding notes, should be farther considered.

    In all countries, and under all religions, fasting has not only been considered a duty, but also of extraordinary virtue to procure blessings, and to avert evils. Hence it has often been practised with extraordinary rigour, and abused to the most superstitious purposes. There are twelve kinds of fasts among the Hindoos: -

    1. The person neither eats nor drinks for a day and night. This fast is indispensable, and occurs twenty-nine times in the year.

    2. The person fasts during the day, and eats at night.

    3. The person eats nothing but fruits, and drinks milk or water.

    4. He eats once during the day and night.

    5. Eats one particular kind of food during the day and night, but as often as he pleases.

    6. Called Chanderaym, which is, to eat on the first day, only one mouthful; two on the second; and thus continue increasing one mouthful every day for a month, and then decreasing a mouthful every day, till he leaves off where he began.

    7. The person neither eats nor drinks for twelve days.

    8. Lasts twelve days: the first three days he eats a little once in the day; the next three, he eats only once in the night; the next three, he eats nothing, unless it be brought to him; and, during the last three days, he neither eats nor drinks.

    9. Lasts fifteen days. For three days and three nights, he eats only one handful at night; the next three days and nights, he eats one handful if it be brought him, if not, he takes nothing. Then he eats nothing for three days and three nights. The next three days and nights he takes only a handful of warm water each day. The next three days and nights he takes a handful of warm milk each day.

    10. For three days and nights he neither eats nor drinks. He lights a fire, and sits at a door where there enters a hot wind, which he draws in with his breath.

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