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Micah 1:9

    Micah 1:9 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    For her wound is incurable; for it is come unto Judah; he is come unto the gate of my people, even to Jerusalem.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    For her wound is incurable; for it is come to Judah; he is come to the gate of my people, even to Jerusalem.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    For her wounds are incurable; for it is come even unto Judah; it reacheth unto the gate of my people, even to Jerusalem.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    For her wounds may not be made well: for it has come even to Judah, stretching up to the doorway of my people, even to Jerusalem.

    Webster's Revision

    For her wounds are incurable; for it is come even unto Judah; it reacheth unto the gate of my people, even to Jerusalem.

    World English Bible

    For her wounds are incurable; for it has come even to Judah. It reaches to the gate of my people, even to Jerusalem.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    For her wounds are incurable: for it is come even unto Judah; it reacheth unto the gate of my people, even to Jerusalem.

    Clarke's Commentary on Micah 1:9

    Her wound is incurable - Nothing shall prevent their utter ruin, for they have filled up the measure of their iniquity.

    He is come - even to Jerusalem - The desolation and captivity of Israel shall first take place; that of Judah shall come after.

    Barnes' Notes on Micah 1:9

    For her - Samaria's

    Wound - o, (literally, her wounds, or strokes, (the word is used especially of those inflicted by God, (Leviticus 26:21; Numbers 11:33; Deuteronomy 28:59, Deuteronomy 28:61, etc.) each, one by one,) is incurable The idiom is used of inflictions on the body politic (Nahum 3 ult.; Jeremiah 30:12, Jeremiah 30:15) or the mind , for which there is no remedy. The wounds were very sick, or incurable, not in themselves or on God's part, but on Israel's. The day of grace passes away at last, when man has so steeled himself against grace, as to be morally dead, having deadened himself to all capacity of repentance.

    For it is come unto - (quite up to) Judah; he, (the enemy,) is come (literally, hath reached, touched,) to (quite up to) the gate of my people, even to (quite up to) Jerusalem Jerome: "The same sin, yea, the same punishment for sin, which overthrew Samaria, shall even come unto, quite up to Judah. Then the prophet suddenly changes the gender, and, as Scripture so often does, speaks of the one agent, the center and impersonation of the coming evil, as sweeping on over Judah, quite up to the gate of his people, quite up to Jerusalem. He does not say here, whether Jerusalem would be taken; and so, it seems likely that he speaks of a calamity short of excision. Of Israel's wounds only he here says, that they are incurable; he describes the wasting of even lesser places near or beyond Jerusalem, the flight of their inhabitants. Of the capital itself he is silent, except that the enemy reached, touched, struck against it, quite up to it. Probably, then, he is here describing the first visitation of God, when 2 Kings 18:13 Sennacherib came up against all the fenced cities of Judah and took them, but Jerusalem was spared. God's judgments come step by step, leaving time for repentance. The same enemy, although not the same king, came against Jerusalem who had wasted Samaria. Samaria was probably as strong as Jerusalem. Hezekiah prayed; God heard, the Assyrian army perished by miracle; Jerusalem was respited for 124 years.