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Micah 6:1

    Micah 6:1 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Hear ye now what the LORD saith; Arise, contend thou before the mountains, and let the hills hear thy voice.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Hear you now what the LORD said; Arise, contend you before the mountains, and let the hills hear your voice.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Hear ye now what Jehovah saith: Arise, contend thou before the mountains, and let the hills hear thy voice.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Give ear now to the words of the Lord: Up! put forward your cause before the mountains, let your voice be sounding among the hills.

    Webster's Revision

    Hear ye now what Jehovah saith: Arise, contend thou before the mountains, and let the hills hear thy voice.

    World English Bible

    Listen now to what Yahweh says: "Arise, plead your case before the mountains, and let the hills hear what you have to say.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Hear ye now what the LORD saith: Arise, contend thou before the mountains, and let the hills hear thy voice.

    Definitions for Micah 6:1

    Let - To hinder or obstruct.

    Clarke's Commentary on Micah 6:1

    Arise, contend thou - This chapter is a sort of dialogue between God and the people. God speaks the five first verses, and convicts the people of sin, righteousness, and judgment. The People, convinced of their iniquity, deprecate God's judgments, in the sixth and seventh verses. In the eighth verse God prescribes the way in which they are to be saved; and then the prophet, by the command of God, goes on to remonstrate from the ninth verse to the end of the chapter.

    Barnes' Notes on Micah 6:1

    Hear ye now what the Lord saith - If ye will not hear the rebuke of man, hear now at last the word of God. "Arise thou, Micah." The prophet was not willing to be the herald of woe to his people; but had to arise at the bidding of God, that he might not "be rebellious like that rebellious house" Ezekiel 2:8. Stand up; as one having all authority to rebuke, and daunted by none. He muses the hearer, as shewing it to be a very grave urgent matter, to be done promptly, urgently, without delay. "Contend thou before (better, as in the English margin with) the mountains." Since man, who had reason, would not use his reason, God calls the mountains and hills, who Romans 8:20 unwillingly, as it were, had been the scenes of their idolatry, as if he would say (Lap.), "Insensate though ye be, ye are more sensible than Israel, whom I endowed with sense; for ye feel the voice and command of God your Creator and obey Him; they do not. I cite you, to represent your guilty inhabitants, that, through you, they may hear My complaint to be just, and own themselves guilty, repent, and ask forgiveness." "The altars and idols, the blood of the sacrifices, the bones and ashes upon them, with unuttered yet clear voice, spoke of the idolatry and guilt of the Jews, and so pronounced God's charge and expostulation to be just. Ezekiel is bidden, in like way, to prophesy against "the mountains of Israel Ezekiel 6:2-5, "I will bring a sword upon you, and I will destroy your high places, and your altars shall be desolate." : "Lifeless nature without voice tells the glory of God; without ears it hears what the Lord speaks." Psalm 19:3; Luke 19:40.