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Numbers 12:3

    Numbers 12:3 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    (Now the man Moses was very meek, above all the men which were upon the face of the earth.)

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    (Now the man Moses was very meek, above all the men which were on the face of the earth.)

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Now the man Moses was very meek, above all the men that were upon the face of the earth.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Now the man Moses was more gentle than any other man on earth.

    Webster's Revision

    Now the man Moses was very meek, above all the men that were upon the face of the earth.

    World English Bible

    Now the man Moses was very humble, above all the men who were on the surface of the earth.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Now the man Moses was very meek, above all the men which were upon the face of the earth.

    Definitions for Numbers 12:3

    Meek - Gentle; tender; free from pride.

    Clarke's Commentary on Numbers 12:3

    Now the man Moses was very meek - How could Moses, who certainly was as humble and modest as he was meek, write this encomium upon himself? I think the word is not rightly understood; ענו anav, which we translate meek, comes from ענה anah, to act upon, to humble, depress, afflict, and is translated so in many places in the Old Testament; and in this sense it should be understood here: "Now this man Moses was depressed or afflicted more than any man האדמה haadamah, of that land." And why was he so? Because of the great burden he had to bear in the care and government of this people, and because of their ingratitude and rebellion both against God and himself: of this depression and affliction, see the fullest proof in the preceding chapter, Numbers 11 (note). The very power they envied was oppressive to its possessor, and was more than either of their shoulders could sustain.

    Barnes' Notes on Numbers 12:3

    The man Moses was very meek - In this and in other passages in which Moses no less unequivocally records his own faults (compare Numbers 20:12 ff; Exodus 4:24 ff; Deuteronomy 1:37), there is the simplicity of one who bare witness of himself, but not to himself (compare Matthew 11:28-29). The words are inserted to explain how it was that Moses took no steps to vindicate himself, and why consequently the Lord so promptly intervened.

    Wesley's Notes on Numbers 12:3

    12:3 Meek - This is added as the reason why Moses took no notice of their reproach, and why God did so severely plead his cause. Thus was he fitted for the work he was called to, which required all the meekness he had. And this is often more tried by the unkindness of our friends, than by the malice of our enemies. Probably this commendation was added, as some other clauses were, by some succeeding prophet. How was Moses so meek, when we often read of his anger? But this only proves, that the law made nothing perfect.