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Numbers 5:4

    Numbers 5:4 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And the children of Israel did so, and put them out without the camp: as the LORD spake unto Moses, so did the children of Israel.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And the children of Israel did so, and put them out without the camp: as the LORD spoke to Moses, so did the children of Israel.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And the children of Israel did so, and put them out without the camp; as Jehovah spake unto Moses, so did the children of Israel.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    So the children of Israel did as the Lord had said to Moses, and put them outside the tent-circle.

    Webster's Revision

    And the children of Israel did so, and put them out without the camp; as Jehovah spake unto Moses, so did the children of Israel.

    World English Bible

    The children of Israel did so, and put them out outside of the camp; as Yahweh spoke to Moses, so did the children of Israel.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And the children of Israel did so, and put them out without the camp: as the LORD spake unto Moses, so did the children of Israel.

    Definitions for Numbers 5:4

    Without - Outside.

    Clarke's Commentary on Numbers 5:4

    And the children of Israel - put them out - This is the earliest account we have of such separations; and probably this ordinance gave the first idea of a hospital, where all those who are afflicted with contagious disorders are put into particular wards, under medical treatment. Though no mention be made of the situation, circumstances, etc., of those expelled persons, we may certainly infer that they were treated with that humanity which their distressed state required. Though sinners must be separated from the Church of God, yet they should be treated with affectionate regard, because they may be reclaimed. It is too often the case when a man backslides from the way of truth, he is abandoned by all; finding his case desperate, he plunges yet deeper into the mire of sin, and the man who, with tender treatment, might have been reclaimed, becomes incurably hardened. One class says, he cannot finally fall, and shall in due time be restored; another class says, he may finally fall and utterly perish. If the unfortunate person be restored, his recovery is taken as a proof of the first doctrine; if he be not, his wretched end is considered a proof of the second. In the first case the person himself may presume on his restoration as a point infallibly determined in the Divine counsel; or in the second, he may consider his case hopeless, and so abandon himself to profligacy and desperation. Thus both parties leave him, and both opinions (misunderstood certainly) render him secure or desperate; and in either case totally inactive in behalf of his own soul. Who is he that properly estimates the worth of one immortal spirit? He who does will at once feel that, in a state of probation, any man may fall through sin, and any sinner may be renewed again unto repentance, through the infinitely meritorious sacrifice, and all powerfully efficacious grace, of Christ. This truth properly felt equally precludes both presumption and despair, and will induce the followers of God to be active in preserving those who have escaped from the corruption that is in the world, and make them diligent to recover those who have turned back to earth and sin.