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Philemon 1:20

    Philemon 1:20 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Yea, brother, let me have joy of thee in the Lord: refresh my bowels in the Lord.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Yes, brother, let me have joy of you in the Lord: refresh my bowels in the Lord.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Yea, brother, let me have joy of thee in the Lord: refresh my heart in Christ.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    So brother, let me have joy of you in the Lord: give new life to my heart in Christ.

    Webster's Revision

    Yea, brother, let me have joy of thee in the Lord: refresh my heart in Christ.

    World English Bible

    Yes, brother, let me have joy from you in the Lord. Refresh my heart in the Lord.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Yea, brother, let me have joy of thee in the Lord: refresh my heart in Christ.

    Definitions for Philemon 1:20

    Bowels - Inward parts; affections.
    Let - To hinder or obstruct.
    Yea - Yes; certainly.

    Clarke's Commentary on Philemon 1:20

    Yea, brother - It is even so, that thou art thus indebted to me. Let me have joy of thee, in forgiving Onesimus, and receiving him into thy favor. In the words εγε σου οναιμην, which we should translate, let me have Profit of thee, there is an evident paronomasia, or play on the name of Onesimus. See on Plm 1:2((note), Plm 1:11 (note).

    Refresh my bowels - Gratify the earnest longing of my soul in this. I ask neither thy money nor goods; I ask what will enrich, not impoverish, thee to give.

    Barnes' Notes on Philemon 1:20

    Yea, brother, let me have joy of thee in the Lord - "By showing me this favor in receiving my friend and brother as I request." The phrase "in the Lord," here seems to mean that, if this request was granted, he would recognize the hand of the Lord in it, and would receive it as a favor from him.

    Refresh my bowels in the Lord - The "bowels," in the Scriptures, are uniformly spoken of as the seat of the affections - meaning commonly the upper viscera, embracing the heart and the lungs; compare the notes at Isaiah 16:11. The reason is, that in any deep emotion this part of our frame is peculiarly affected, or we feel it there. Compare Robinson's Lex. on the word σπλάγχνον splangchnon See this illustrated at length in Sir Charles Bell's" Anatomy of Expression," p. 85, following Ed. London, 1844. The idea here is, that Paul had such a tender affection for Onesimus as to give him great concern and uneasiness. The word rendered "refresh" - ἀνάπαυσόν anapauson - means "to give rest to, to give repose, to free from sorrow or care;" and the sense is, that by receiving Onesimus, Philemon would cause the deep and anxious feelings of Paul to cease, and he would be calm and happy; compare the notes at Plm 1:7.

    Wesley's Notes on Philemon 1:20

    1:20 Refresh my bowels in Christ - Give me the most exquisite and Christian pleasure.