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Philippians 3:4

    Philippians 3:4 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Though I might also have confidence in the flesh. If any other man thinketh that he hath whereof he might trust in the flesh, I more:

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Though I might also have confidence in the flesh. If any other man thinks that he has whereof he might trust in the flesh, I more:

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    though I myself might have confidence even in the flesh: if any other man thinketh to have confidence in the flesh, I yet more:

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Even though I myself might have faith in the flesh: if any other man has reason to have faith in the flesh, I have more:

    Webster's Revision

    though I myself might have confidence even in the flesh: if any other man thinketh to have confidence in the flesh, I yet more:

    World English Bible

    though I myself might have confidence even in the flesh. If any other man thinks that he has confidence in the flesh, I yet more:

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    though I myself might have confidence even in the flesh: if any other man thinketh to have confidence in the flesh, I yet more:

    Clarke's Commentary on Philippians 3:4

    Though I might also have confidence - If any of them have any cause to boast in outward rites and privileges, I have as much; yea, more.

    Barnes' Notes on Philippians 3:4

    Though I might also have confidence in the flesh - That is, though I had uncommon advantages of this kind; and if anyone could have trusted in them, I could have done it. The object of the apostle is to show that he did not despise those things because he did not possess them, but because he now saw that they were of no value in the great matter of salvation. Once he had confided in them, and if anyone could find any ground of reliance on them, he could have found more than any of them. But he had seen that all these things were valueless in regard to the salvation of the soul. We may remark here, that Christians do not despise or disregard advantages of birth, or amiableness of manners, or external morality, because they do not possess them - but because they regard them as insufficient to secure their salvation. They who have been most amiable and moral before their conversion will speak in the most decided manner of the insufficiency of these things for salvation, and of the danger of relying on them. They have once tried it, and they now see that their feet were standing on a slippery rock. The Greek here is, literally: "although I((was) having confidence in the flesh." The meaning is, that he had every ground of confidence in the flesh which anyone could have, and that if there was any advantage for salvation to be derived from birth, and blood, and external conformity to the law, he possessed it. He had more to rely on than most other people had; nay, he could have boasted of advantages of this sort which could not be found united in any other individual. What those advantages were, he proceeds to specify.

    Wesley's Notes on Philippians 3:4

    3:4 Though I - He subjoins this in the singular number, because the Philippians could not say thus.