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Philippians 3:6

    Philippians 3:6 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Concerning zeal, persecuting the church; touching the righteousness which is in the law, blameless.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Concerning zeal, persecuting the church; touching the righteousness which is in the law, blameless.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    as touching zeal, persecuting the church; as touching the righteousness which is in the law, found blameless.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    In bitter hate I was cruel to the church; I kept all the righteousness of the law to the last detail.

    Webster's Revision

    as touching zeal, persecuting the church; as touching the righteousness which is in the law, found blameless.

    World English Bible

    concerning zeal, persecuting the assembly; concerning the righteousness which is in the law, found blameless.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    as touching zeal, persecuting the church; as touching the righteousness which is in the law, found blameless.

    Definitions for Philippians 3:6

    Church - Assembly of "called out" ones.

    Clarke's Commentary on Philippians 3:6

    Concerning zeal - As to my zeal for Pharisaism, I gave the fullest proof of it by persecuting the Church of Christ; and this is known to all my countrymen.

    Touching the righteousness - And as to that plan of justification, which justification the Jews say is to be obtained by an observance of the law, I have done every thing so conscientiously from my youth up, that in this respect I am blameless; and may, with more confidence than most of them; expect that justification which the law appears to promise.

    Barnes' Notes on Philippians 3:6

    Concerning zeal, persecuting the church - Showing the greatness of my zeal for the religion which I believed to be true, by persecuting those whom I considered to be in dangerous error. Zeal was supposed to be, as it is, an important part of religion; see 2 Kings 10:16; Psalm 69:9; Psalm 119:139; Isaiah 59:17; Romans 10:2. Paul says that he had shown the highest degree of zeal that was possible. He had gone so far in his attachment for the religion of his fathers, as to pursue with purposes of death those who had departed from it, and who had embraced a different form of belief. If any, therefore, could hope for salvation on the ground of extraordinary devotedness to religion, he said that he could.

    Touching the righteousness which is in the law, blameless - So far as the righteousness which can be obtained by obeying the law is concerned. It is not needful to suppose here that he refers merely to the ceremonial law; but the meaning is, that he did all that could be done to obtain salvation by the mere observance of law. It was supposed by the Jews, and especially by the Pharisees, to which sect he belonged, that it was possible to be saved in that way; and Paul says that he had done all that was supposed to be necessary for that. We are not to imagine that, when he penned this declaration, he meant to be understood as saying that he had wholly complied with the law of God; but that, before his conversion, he supposed that he had done all that was necessary to be done in order to be saved by the observance of law he neglected no duty that he understood it to enjoin. He was not guilty of deliberately violating it.

    He led a moral and strictly upright life, and no one had occasion to "blame" or to accuse him as a violator of the law of God. There is every reason to believe that Paul, before his conversion, was a young man of correct deportment, of upright life, of entire integrity; and that he was free from the indulgences of vice and passion, into which young people often fall. In all that he ever says of himself as being "the chief of sinners," and as being "unworthy to be called an apostle," he never gives the least intimation that his early life was stained by vice, or corrupted by licentious passions. On the contrary, we are left to the fair presumption that, if any man could be saved by his own works, he was that man. This fact should be allowed to make its proper impression on those who are seeking salvation in the same way; and they should be willing to inquire whether they may not be deceived in the matter, as he was, and whether they are not in as much real danger in depending on their own righteousness, as was this most upright and zealous young man.

    Wesley's Notes on Philippians 3:6

    3:6 Having such a zeal for it as to persecute to the death those who did not observe it. Touching the righteousness which is described and enjoined by the Law - That is, external observances, blameless.