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Philippians 4:22

    Philippians 4:22 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    All the saints salute you, chiefly they that are of Caesar's household.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    All the saints salute you, chiefly they that are of Caesar's household.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    All the saints salute you, especially they that are of Caesar's household.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    All the saints send their love to you, specially those who are of Caesar's house.

    Webster's Revision

    All the saints salute you, especially they that are of Caesar's household.

    World English Bible

    All the saints greet you, especially those who are of Caesar's household.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    All the saints salute you, especially they that are of Caesar's household.

    Definitions for Philippians 4:22

    Saints - Men and women of God.

    Clarke's Commentary on Philippians 4:22

    All the saints - All the Christians now at Rome.

    They that are of Caesar's household - Nero was at this time emperor of Rome: a more worthless, cruel, and diabolic wretch never disgraced the name or form of man; yet in his family there were Christians: but whether this relates to the members of the imperial family, or to guards, or courtiers, or to servants, we cannot tell. If even some of his slaves were converted to Christianity, it would he sufficiently marvellous. Converts to Christianity in this family there certainly were; and this shows how powerfully the Divine word had been preached and spread. That the Empress Poppaea may have been favourably inclined to Christianity is possible; for Josephus relates of her, Antiq., lib. xx. cap. 7: Θεοσεβης γαρ ην· She was a worshipper of the true God; it is not likely, therefore, that she threw any hinderances in the way of her servants who might wish to embrace the Christian faith. St. Jerome, in Philemon, states that St. Paul had converted many in Caesar's family; A Caesare missus in carcerem, notior familiae ejus factus, persecutoris Christi domum fecit ecclesiam.

    "Being by the emperor cast into prison, he became the more known to his family, and he turned the house of Christ's persecutor into a church." Some imagine that Seneca, the preceptor of Nero and the poet Lucan, were converted by St. Paul; and there are still extant, and in a MS. now before me, letters which profess to have passed between Paul and Seneca; but they are worthy of neither. They have been printed in some editions of Seneca's works. See the remarks below.

    Barnes' Notes on Philippians 4:22

    All the saints salute you - All in Rome, where this Epistle was written. No individuals are specified, perhaps because none of the Christians at Rome wore personally known to the church at Philippi. They would, however, feel a deep interest in a church which had thus the confidence and affection of Paul. There is reason to believe that the bonds of affection among the churches then were much stronger than they are now. There was a generous warmth in the newness of the Christian affection - the first ardor of love; and the common trials to which they were exposed would serve to bind them closely together.

    Chiefly they that are of Caesar's household - That is, of Nero, who was at that time the reigning emperor. The name Caesar was given to all the emperors after the time of Julius Caesar, as the name Pharaoh was the common name of the kings of Egypt. The phrase used here - "the household of Caesar" - may refer to the relatives of the emperor; and it is certainly possible that some of them may have been converted to Christianity. But it does not of necessity refer to those related to him, but may be applied to his domestics, or to some of the officers of the court that were more particularly employed around his person; and as it is more probable that some of them would be converted than his own relatives, it is more safe to suppose that they were intended; see the notes at Philippians 1:13.