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Proverbs 1:17

    Proverbs 1:17 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Surely in vain the net is spread in the sight of any bird.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Surely in vain the net is spread in the sight of any bird.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    For in vain is the net spread In the sight of any bird:

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Truly, to no purpose is the net stretched out before the eyes of the bird:

    Webster's Revision

    For in vain is the net spread In the sight of any bird:

    World English Bible

    For in vain is the net spread in the sight of any bird:

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    For in vain is the net spread, in the eyes of any bird:

    Definitions for Proverbs 1:17

    Vain - Empty; foolish; useless.

    Clarke's Commentary on Proverbs 1:17

    Surely in vain the net is spread in the sight of any bird - This is a proverb of which the wise man here makes a particular use; and the meaning does not seem as difficult as some imagine. The wicked are represented as lurking privily for the innocent. It is in this way alone that they can hope to destroy them and take their substance; for if their designs were known, proper precautions would be taken against them; for it would be vain to spread the net in the sight of those birds which men wish to ensnare. Attend therefore to my counsels, and they shall never be able to ensnare thee.

    Barnes' Notes on Proverbs 1:17

    Strictly speaking, this is the first proverb (i. e., similitude) in the book; a proverb which has received a variety of interpretations. The true meaning seems to be as follows: "For in vain, to no purpose, is the net spread out openly. Clear as the warning is, it is in vain. The birds still fly in. The great net of God's judgments is spread out, open to the eyes of all, and yet the doers of evil, willfully blind, still rush into it." Others take the words as pointing to the failure of the plans of the evil-doers against the innocent (the "bird"): others, again, interpret the proverb of the young man who thinks that he at least shall not fall into the snares laid for him, and so goes blindly into them.

    Wesley's Notes on Proverbs 1:17

    1:17 In vain - The fowler who spreads, his net in the sight of the bird looseth his labour. But these, are more foolish than the silly birds, and though they are not ignorant of the mischief which these evil courses will bring upon themselves, yet they will not take warning.