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Proverbs 12:9

    Proverbs 12:9 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    He that is despised, and hath a servant, is better than he that honoureth himself, and lacketh bread.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    He that is despised, and has a servant, is better than he that honors himself, and lacks bread.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Better is he that is lightly esteemed, and hath a servant, Than he that honoreth himself, and lacketh bread.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    He who is of low position and has a servant, is better than one who has a high opinion of himself and is in need of bread.

    Webster's Revision

    Better is he that is lightly esteemed, and hath a servant, Than he that honoreth himself, and lacketh bread.

    World English Bible

    Better is he who is lightly esteemed, and has a servant, than he who honors himself, and lacks bread.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Better is he that is lightly esteemed, and hath a servant, than he that honoureth himself, and lacketh bread.

    Clarke's Commentary on Proverbs 12:9

    He that is despised, and hath a servant - I believe the Vulgate gives the true sense of this verse: Melior est pauper, et sufficiens sibi; quam gloriosus, et indigens pane.

    "Better is the poor man who provides for himself, than the proud who is destitute of bread." The versions in general agree in this sense. This needs no comment. There are some who, through pride of birth, etc., would rather starve, than put their hands to menial labor. Though they may be lords, how much to be preferred is the simple peasant, who supports himself and family by the drudgery of life!

    Barnes' Notes on Proverbs 12:9

    Two interpretations are equally tenable;

    (1) as in the King James Version, He whom men despise, or who is "lowly" in his own eyes (compare 1 Samuel 18:23), if he has a slave, i. e., if he is one step above absolute poverty, and has some one to supply his wants, is better off than the man who boasts of rank or descent and has nothing to eat. Respectable mediocrity is better than boastful poverty.

    (2) he who, though despised, is a servant to himself, i. e., supplies his own wants, is better than the arrogant and helpless.

    Wesley's Notes on Proverbs 12:9

    12:9 Despised - That lives in a mean condition. Honoureth - That glories in his high birth or gay attire.