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Proverbs 14:20

    Proverbs 14:20 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    The poor is hated even of his own neighbour: but the rich hath many friends.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    The poor is hated even of his own neighbor: but the rich has many friends.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    The poor is hated even of his own neighbor; But the rich hath many friends.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    The poor man is hated even by his neighbour, but the man of wealth has numbers of friends.

    Webster's Revision

    The poor is hated even of his own neighbor; But the rich hath many friends.

    World English Bible

    The poor person is shunned even by his own neighbor, but the rich person has many friends.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    The poor is hated even of his own neighbour: but the rich hath many friends.

    Clarke's Commentary on Proverbs 14:20

    But the rich hath many friends - Many who speak to him the language of friendship; but if they profess friendship because he is rich, there is not one real friend among them. There is a fine saying of Cicero on this subject: Ut hirundines festivo tempore praesto sunt, frigore pulsae recedunt: ita falsi amici sereno tempore praesto sunt: simul atque fortunae hiemem viderint, evolant omnes - Lib. iv., ad Herenn. "They are like swallows, who fly off during the winter, and quit our cold climates; and do not return till the warm season: but as soon as the winter sets in, they are all off again." So Horace: -

    Donec eris felix, multos numerabis amicos:Nullus ad amissas ibit amicus opes.

    "As long as thou art prosperous, thou shalt have many friends: but who of them will regard thee when thou hast lost thy wealth?"

    Barnes' Notes on Proverbs 14:20

    The maxim, jarring as it is, represents the generalization of a wide experience; but the words which follow Proverbs 14:21 show that it is not to be taken by itself. In spite of all the selfish morality of mere prudence, the hearer is warned that to despise his "neighbor" (Christians must take the word in all the width given to it by the parable of the Good Samaritan) is to sin. The fullness of blessing comes on him who sees in the poor the objects of his mercy.

    Wesley's Notes on Proverbs 14:20

    14:20 Hated - Despised and abandoned.