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Proverbs 16:32

    Proverbs 16:32 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    He that is slow to anger is better than the mighty; and he that ruleth his spirit than he that taketh a city.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    He that is slow to anger is better than the mighty; and he that rules his spirit than he that takes a city.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    He that is slow to anger is better than the mighty; And he that ruleth his spirit, than he that taketh a city.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    He who is slow to be angry is better than a man of war, and he who has control over his spirit than he who takes a town.

    Webster's Revision

    He that is slow to anger is better than the mighty; And he that ruleth his spirit, than he that taketh a city.

    World English Bible

    One who is slow to anger is better than the mighty; one who rules his spirit, than he who takes a city.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    He that is slow to anger is better than the mighty; and he that ruleth his spirit than he that taketh a city.

    Clarke's Commentary on Proverbs 16:32

    He that ruleth his spirit, than he that taketh a city - It is much easier to subdue an enemy without than one within. There have been many kings who had conquered nations, and yet were slaves to their own passions. Alexander, who conquered the world, was a slave to intemperate anger, and in a fit of it slew Clytus, the best and most intimate of all his friends, and one whom he loved beyond all others.

    The spirit of this maxim is so self-evident, that most nations have formed similar proverbs. The classical reader will remember the following in Hor., Odar. lib. ii., Od. 2: -

    Latius regnes, avidum domando

    Spiritum, quam si Libyam remotis

    Gadibus jungas, et uterque Poenus

    Serviat uni.

    "By virtue's precepts to control

    The furious passions of the soul,

    Is over wider realms to reign,

    Unenvied monarch, than if Spain\\\ppar You could to distant Libya join,

    And both the Carthages were thine."

    Francis.

    And the following from Ovid is not less striking: -

    Fortior est qui se, quam qui fortissima vincit

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    Wesley's Notes on Proverbs 16:32

    16:32 Is better - Of a more gallant and generous spirit, and more valiant and victorious.