Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

Proverbs 2:16

    Proverbs 2:16 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    To deliver thee from the strange woman, even from the stranger which flattereth with her words;

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    To deliver you from the strange woman, even from the stranger which flatters with her words;

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    To deliver thee from the strange woman, Even from the foreigner that flattereth with her words;

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    To take you out of the power of the strange woman, who says smooth words with her tongue;

    Webster's Revision

    To deliver thee from the strange woman, Even from the foreigner that flattereth with her words;

    World English Bible

    To deliver you from the strange woman, even from the foreigner who flatters with her words;

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    To deliver thee from the strange woman, even from the stranger which flattereth with her words;

    Clarke's Commentary on Proverbs 2:16

    The stranger which flattereth with her words - החליקה hechelikah, she that smooths with her words. The original intimates the glib, oily speeches of a prostitute. The English lick is supposed to be derived from the original word.

    Barnes' Notes on Proverbs 2:16

    The second great evil, the warnings against which are frequent (see the marginal reference). Two words are used to describe the class.

    (1) "The strange woman" is one who does not belong to the family, one who by birth is outside the covenant of Israel.

    (2) "The stranger" is none other than a foreigner.

    It is the word used of the "strange" wives of Solomon 1 Kings 11:1, 1 Kings 11:8, and of those of the Jews who returned from Babylon (Ezra 10; passim). The two words together, in connection with those which follow, and which imply at once marriage and a profession of religious faith, point to some interesting facts in the social history of Israel. Whatever form the sin here referred to had assumed before the monarchy (and the Book of Judges testifies to its frequency), the contact with Phoenicians and other nations under Solomon had a strong tendency to increase it. The king's example would naturally be followed, and it probably became a fashion to have foreign wives and concubines. At first, it would seem, this was accompanied by some show of proselytism Proverbs 2:17; but the old pagan leaven (influence) presently broke out; the sensual worship of other gods led the way to a life of harlotry. The stringent laws of the Mosaic code Leviticus 19:29; Leviticus 21:9; Deuteronomy 23:18 probably deterred the women of Israel from that sin, and led to a higher standard of purity among them than prevailed among other nations.

    Most interpreters have, however, generalized the words as speaking of any adulteress. The Septuagint as if reluctant to speak of facts so shameful, has allegorized them, and seen in the temptress the personification of "evil counsel."

    Wesley's Notes on Proverbs 2:16

    2:16 Strange woman - From the adulteress or whore.