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Proverbs 20:11

    Proverbs 20:11 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Even a child is known by his doings, whether his work be pure, and whether it be right.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Even a child is known by his doings, whether his work be pure, and whether it be right.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Even a child maketh himself known by his doings, Whether his work be pure, and whether it be right.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Even a child may be judged by his doings, if his work is free from sin and if it is right.

    Webster's Revision

    Even a child maketh himself known by his doings, Whether his work be pure, and whether it be right.

    World English Bible

    Even a child makes himself known by his doings, whether his work is pure, and whether it is right.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Even a child maketh himself known by his doings, whether his work be pure, and whether it be right.

    Clarke's Commentary on Proverbs 20:11

    Even a child is known by his doings - That is, in general terms, the effect shows the nature of the cause. "A childe is known by his conversation," says Coverdale. A child is easily detected when he has done evil; he immediately begins to excuse and vindicate himself, and profess his innocence, almost before accusation takes place. Some think the words should be understood, every child will dissemble; this amounts nearly to the meaning given above, But probably the principal this intended by the wise man is, that we may easily learn from the child what the man will be. In general, they give indications of those trades and callings for which they are adapted by nature. And, on the whole, we cannot go by a surer guide in preparing our children for future life, than by observing their early propensities. The future engineer is seen in the little handicraftsman of two years old. Many children are crossed in these early propensities to a particular calling, to their great prejudice, and the loss of their parents, as they seldom settle at, or succeed in, the business to which they are tied, and to which nature has given them no tendency. These infantine predilections to particular callings, we should consider as indications of Divine Providence, and its calling of them to that work for which they are peculiarly fitted.

    Barnes' Notes on Proverbs 20:11

    The graces or the faults of children are not trifles. "The child is father of the man;" and the earliest actions are prophecies of the future, whether it will be pure and right, or unclean and evil.

    Wesley's Notes on Proverbs 20:11

    20:11 Is known - The future disposition of a man may be probably conjectured from his childish manners.