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Psalms 10:9

    Psalms 10:9 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    He lieth in wait secretly as a lion in his den: he lieth in wait to catch the poor: he doth catch the poor, when he draweth him into his net.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    He lies in wait secretly as a lion in his den: he lies in wait to catch the poor: he does catch the poor, when he draws him into his net.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    He lurketh in secret as a lion in his covert; He lieth in wait to catch the poor: He doth catch the poor, when he draweth him in his net.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    He keeps himself in a secret place like a lion in his hole, waiting to put his hands on the poor man, and pulling him into his net.

    Webster's Revision

    He lurketh in secret as a lion in his covert; He lieth in wait to catch the poor: He doth catch the poor, when he draweth him in his net.

    World English Bible

    He lurks in secret as a lion in his ambush. He lies in wait to catch the helpless. He catches the helpless, when he draws him in his net.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    He lurketh in the covert as a lion in his den: he lieth in wait to catch the poor: he doth catch the poor, when he draweth him in his net.

    Definitions for Psalms 10:9

    Doth - To do; to produce; make.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 10:9

    He lieth in wait secretly - Margin, in the secret places. See the note at Psalm 10:8. The object here is merely to illustrate the thought in the previous verse, by an allusion to a lion and a hunter.

    As a lion in his den - As a lion crouches down in his den, ready to spring upon his prey. That is, the lion is concealed, but is on the look out, and when his prey passes near his den, he suddenly springs upon it and secures it. So it is with the wicked man. He carefully lays his plans. He conceals his purposes. He is himself hidden, or his plans are all hidden. Suddenly he springs upon his victim, who is taken by surprise and has no power of defense or escape. The purpose here is not so much to describe the wicked man as a literal robber, as to compare the conduct of the wicked with that of a robber - one who, like a lion or a hunter, lies concealed until his victim is seen. This will describe the conduct of a large class of people - men who secretly lay plans of seduction, villany, and fraud, and who spring suddenly upon their victims when there is no hope of escape.

    He lieth in wait to catch the poor - The helpless and defenseless.

    He doth catch the poor, when he draweth him into his net - As a hunter does the wild beast. Here the same thought is presented under a new image - that of a hunter. He lays his snare, gin, or pit-fall, and when the animal is allured into it, he springs the net suddenly on him, or the animal sinks into the pit, and is secured. See the note at Psalm 7:15; the note at Psalm 9:15.