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Psalms 103:3

    Psalms 103:3 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Who forgiveth all thine iniquities; who healeth all thy diseases;

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Who forgives all your iniquities; who heals all your diseases;

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Who forgiveth all thine iniquities; Who healeth all thy diseases;

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    He has forgiveness for all your sins; he takes away all your diseases;

    Webster's Revision

    Who forgiveth all thine iniquities; Who healeth all thy diseases;

    World English Bible

    who forgives all your sins; who heals all your diseases;

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Who forgiveth all thine iniquities; who healeth all thy diseases;

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 103:3

    Who forgiveth - The benefits are the following,

    1. Forgiveness of sin.

    2. Restoration of health: "Who healeth all thy diseases."

    Psalm 103:3.Where the latter line only varies the expression of the former. And our blessed Savior reasons with the Jews on the same principle: "Whether is it easier to say to the sick of the palsy, Thy sins are forgiven thee; or to say, Arise, and take up thy bed, and walk?" Mark 2:9. See also Matthew 8:17; Isaiah 53:4. Qui locus Isaiae, 1 Peter 2:24, refertur ad remissionem peccatorum: hic vero ad sanationem morborum, quia ejusdem potentiae et bonitatis est utrumque praestare; et, quia peccatis remissis, et morbi, qui fructus sunt peccatorum, pelluntur. "Which passage of Isaiah has reference, in 1 Peter 2:24, to the remission of sins, and here to the healing of diseases, because both are effects of the same power and goodness; and because with the remission of sins was associated the removal of disorders, the fruits of sin." - Wetstein on Matthew 8:17.

    That this prophecy was exactly fulfilled, I think we may gather from the history of this great event given by the prophet himself. It is plain that Hezekiah, by his treaty with Sennacherib, by which he agreed to pay him three hundred talents of silver and thirty talents of gold, had stripped himself of his whole treasure. He not only gave him all the silver and gold that was in his own treasury and in that of the temple, but was even forced to cut off the gold from the doors of the temple and from the pillars, with which he had himself overlaid them, to satisfy the demands of the king of Assyria: but after the destruction of the Assyrian army, we find that he "had exceeding much riches, and that he made himself treasuries for silver, and for gold, and for precious stones, "etc.2 Chronicles 32:27. He was so rich, that out of pride and vanity he displayed his wealth to the ambassadors from Babylon. This cannot be otherwise accounted for, than by the prodigious spoil that was taken on the destruction of the Assyrian army. - L. And thus, in the providence of God, he had the wealth which was exacted from him restored.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 103:3

    Who forgiveth all thine iniquities - Pardoning all thy sins. That is, It is a characteristic of God to pardon sin, and I have evidence that he has done it in my own case, and this is a ground for praise. It is observable that this is the first thing in view of the psalmist - the first of the "benefits" which he had received from God, or the first thing in importance among his acts or his dealings, which called for praise. Properly considered, this is the first thing which calls for praise. That God is a merciful God - that he has declared his willingness to pardon sin - that he has devised and revealed a way by which this can be done, and that he has actually done it in our own case, is the most important matter for which we should praise him. When we understand all the things which most affect our welfare, and which enter most deeply into our happiness here and hereafter, we shall find that this is a blessing compared with which all other favors are comparative trifles.

    Who healeth all thy diseases - Perhaps, in the case of the psalmist, referring to some particular instance in which he had been recovered from dangerous sickness. The word rendered "diseases" - תחלואים tachălû'iym - occurs only in the plural form. It is translated "sicknesses," in Deuteronomy 29:22; "diseases," as here, in 2 Chronicles 21:19; "them that are sick," in Jeremiah 14:18; and "grievous (deaths)" in Jeremiah 16:4. It does not elsewhere occur. It is applicable to all forms of sickness; or in this place it may refer to some particular diseases with which David had been afflicted. We have several allusions in the Psalms to times when the authors of the psalms were afflicted with sickness. So in the Psalms of David. Compare Psalm 6:2; Psalm 38:7; Psalm 41:8. The thought here is, that it is a proper ground of praise to God that he has the power of healing disease. All instances of restoration to health are illustrations of this, for whatever may be the skill of physicians, or the wise adaptation of means, healing virtue comes from God alone.

    Verses Related to Psalms 103:3

    Matthew 9:12 - But when Jesus heard that, he said unto them, They that be whole need not a physician, but they that are sick.
    1 Peter 2:24 - Who his own self bare our sins in his own body on the tree, that we, being dead to sins, should live unto righteousness: by whose stripes ye were healed.
    Psalms 107:20 - He sent his word, and healed them, and delivered them from their destructions.