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Psalms 107:8

    Psalms 107:8 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Oh that men would praise the LORD for his goodness, and for his wonderful works to the children of men!

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Oh that men would praise the LORD for his goodness, and for his wonderful works to the children of men!

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Oh that men would praise Jehovah for his lovingkindness, And for his wonderful works to the children of men!

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Let men give praise to the Lord for his mercy, and for the wonders which he does for the children of men!

    Webster's Revision

    Oh that men would praise Jehovah for his lovingkindness, And for his wonderful works to the children of men!

    World English Bible

    Let them praise Yahweh for his loving kindness, for his wonderful works to the children of men!

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Oh that men would praise the LORD for his goodness, and for his wonderful works to the children of men!

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 107:8

    O that men would praise the Lord - This is what is called the intercalary verse, or burden of each part of this responsive song: see the introduction. God should be praised because he is good. We naturally speak highly of those who are eminent. God is infinitely excellent, and should be celebrated for his perfections. But he does wonders for the children of men; and, therefore, men should praise the Lord. And he is the more to be praised, because these wonders, נפלאות niphlaoth, miracles of mercy and grace, are done for the undeserving. They are done לבני אדם libney adam, for the children of Adam, the corrupt descendants of a rebel father.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 107:8

    Oh that men would praise the Lord for his goodness - More literally, "Let such - or, let these - praise the Lord for his goodness," the word "men" having been supplied by our translators. Yet it is not improper to suppose that a wider range is intended than would be denoted if it were confined to those who had then been delivered. It was evidently designed to impress the minds of those who might use this psalm in their devotions; and the idea is, that the deliverance then vouchsafed to the people of God in their troubles should lead all to praise and adore him. Such a surprising interposition suggested an important lesson in regard to God, applicable to all people; and should lead all to praise him in view of the trait of character thus manifested, as that of a God who hears prayer when his people are in trouble, and who can make a straight path before them when they are in danger of being lost, and who can conduct them through the wilderness - the waste places - of this world, as he did his people across the pathless sands of the desert. The true use of all history is to teach us lessons about God.

    And for his wonderful works to the children of men - His doings as suited to excite wonder and admiration. His dealings with his people in the desert furnished one illustration of this; the world is full of such illustrations. The desire expressed in this verse suggests the great lesson of the psalm.