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Psalms 109:10

    Psalms 109:10 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Let his children be continually vagabonds, and beg: let them seek their bread also out of their desolate places.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Let his children be continually vagabonds, and beg: let them seek their bread also out of their desolate places.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Let his children be vagabonds, and beg; And let them seek their bread out of their desolate places.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Let his children be wanderers, looking to others for their food; let them be sent away from the company of their friends.

    Webster's Revision

    Let his children be vagabonds, and beg; And let them seek their bread out of their desolate places.

    World English Bible

    Let his children be wandering beggars. Let them be sought from their ruins.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Let his children be vagabonds, and beg; and let them seek their bread out of their desolate places.

    Definitions for Psalms 109:10

    Let - To hinder or obstruct.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 109:10

    Set his children - beg - The father having lost his office, the children must necessarily be destitute; and this is the hardest lot to which any can become subject, after having been born to the expectation of an ample fortune.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 109:10

    Let his children be continually vagabonds, and beg - Let them continually wander about with no home - no fixed habitation. Let them be compelled to ask their daily food at the hand of charity. Here we enter on a part of the psalm which is more difficult to be reconciled with a proper feeling than the portions which have been considered. It is, indeed, a frequent consequence of crime that the children of those who are punished "are" vagabonds and beggars, but this is not a necessary consequence; and there "seems" here, therefore, to be a mixture of personal feeling, or a feeling of revenge. This runs through the remaining portion of the imprecatory part of the psalm. I confess that it is difficult to explain this without admitting that the expressions are a record only of what actually occurred in the mind of a man, truly pious, but not perfect - a man who thus, to illustrate the workings of the mind even when the general character was holy, was allowed to record his own feelings, though wrong, just as he would record the conduct of another, or his own conduct, though wrong, as a simple matter of fact - a record of what actually was felt. The "record" may be exactly correct; the sentiment recorded may have been wholly incapable of vindication. See the General Introduction, Section 6 (6).

    Let them seek their bread also out of their desolate places - In places uninhabited by man; in barren regions; in deserts: let them be compelled to live on the scanty food which they may pick up there - the roots, or the wild fruits, which will simply keep them alive. See the notes at Job 30:4.

    Wesley's Notes on Psalms 109:10

    109:10 Desolate places - Into which they are fled for fear and shame.