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Psalms 119:17

    Psalms 119:17 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Deal bountifully with thy servant, that I may live, and keep thy word.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Deal bountifully with your servant, that I may live, and keep your word.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    GIMEL. Deal bountifully with thy servant, that I may live; So will I observe thy word.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    <GIMEL> Give me, your servant, the reward of life, so that I may keep your word;

    Webster's Revision

    GIMEL. Deal bountifully with thy servant, that I may live; So will I observe thy word.

    World English Bible

    Do good to your servant. I will live and I will obey your word.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    GIMEL. Deal bountifully with thy servant, that I may live; so will I observe thy word.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 119:17

    Deal bountifully - גמל gemol, reward thy servant. Let him have the return of his faith and prayers, that the Divine life may be preserved in his soul! Then he will keep thy word. From גמל gamal, to reward, etc., comes the name of ג gimel, the third letter in the Hebrew alphabet, which is prefixed to every verse in this part, and commences it with its own name. This is a stroke of the psalmist's art and ingenuity.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 119:17

    Deal bountifully ... - This commences the next portion of the psalm, indicated by the letter Gimel (ג g), the third letter of the Hebrew alphabet, answering to our letter "g." Each verse of this portion Psalm 119:17-24 begins with this letter. There is a resemblance between the first word of this verse - גמל gemol - and the letter - "Gimel" - which commences the eight verses of this portion of the psalm. The noun (derived from the verb) - גמל gâmâl - means a camel, and the letter gimel has been supposed to have derived its name from its having originally a resemblance to the camel's neck. In some of the Phenician inscriptions, and in the Ethiopic alphabet, it has this form (Gesenius, "Lex"). The verb used here means to do, or show, or cause good or evil to anyone; and then to reward, or to recompense, either good or evil. Here it seems to be used in a general sense of doing good, or showing favor, as in Psalm 13:6; Psalm 116:7; Psalm 142:7. Compare Proverbs 11:17. It does not necessarily imply that the author of the psalm had any claim, or demanded this on the ground of merit. He begged the favor, the friendship, the interposition of God in his behalf.

    That I may live - The continuance of life was dependent on the favor of God.

    And keep thy word - For grace to do this he was equally dependent on God; and he asked that life might be continued, in order that he might honor the word of God by obeying it.

    Wesley's Notes on Psalms 119:17

    119:17 Live - Safely and comfortably.