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Psalms 119:96

    Psalms 119:96 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    I have seen an end of all perfection: but thy commandment is exceeding broad.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    I have seen an end of all perfection: but your commandment is exceeding broad.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    MEM. I have seen an end of all perfection; But thy commandment is exceeding broad.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    I have seen that nothing on earth is complete; but your teaching is very wide.

    Webster's Revision

    MEM. I have seen an end of all perfection; But thy commandment is exceeding broad.

    World English Bible

    I have seen a limit to all perfection, but your commands are boundless. MEM

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    I have seen an end of all perfection; but thy commandment is exceeding broad.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 119:96

    I have seen an end of all perfection - Literally, "Of all consummations I have seen the end:" as if one should say, Every thing of human origin has its limits and end, howsoever extensive, noble, and excellent. All arts and sciences, languages, inventions, have their respective principles, have their limits and ends; as they came from man and relate to man, they shall end with man: but thy law, thy revelation, which is a picture of thy own mind, an external manifestation of thy own perfections, conceived in thy infinite ideas, in reference to eternal objects, is exceeding broad; transcends the limits of creation; and extends illimitably into eternity! This has been explained as if it meant: All the real or pretended perfection that men can arrive at in this life is nothing when compared with what the law of God requires. This saying is false in itself, and is no meaning of the text. Whatever God requires of man he can, by his grace, work in man.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 119:96

    I have seen an end of all perfection - The word which is here rendered "perfection" - תכלה tiklâh - occurs only in this place; but a similar word from the same root - תכלית taklı̂yth - occurs in the following places: in Nehemiah 3:21, and Job 26:10, rendered "end;" in Job 11:7; Job 28:3, rendered "perfection;" and in Psalm 139:22, rendered "perfect." It means properly "completion, perfection;" or, as others suppose, "hope, confidence." It is rendered, in the Septuagint and Latin Vulgate, "consummation." Luther renders it, "of all things." It is proper here to apply it to character; to perfect virtue, or to claims to perfect virtue - either in one's-self or in others. The word rendered "end" here refers not to the fact of its existence, or to its duration, but to a limit or boundary as to its extent. To all claims to perfection made by man, he had seen an end or limit. He had examined all which claimed to be perfect; he had found it defective; he had so surveyed and examined the matter, as to be able to say that there could be no claim to perfection which would prove good. All claim to perfection on the part of man must be abandoned forever.

    But thy commandment is exceeding broad - The word but is not in the original, and enfeebles the sense. The idea is, that the law of God, as he now saw it, was of such a nature - was so "broad" - as to demonstrate that there could be no just claim to perfection among people. All claims to perfection had arisen from the fact that the law was not properly understood, that its true nature was not seen. People thought that they were perfect, but it was because they had no just view of the extent and the spirituality of the law of God. They set up an imperfect standard; and when they became conformed to that standard, as they might do, they imagined themselves to be perfect; but when their conduct was compared with a higher and more just standard - the law of God - it could not but be seen that they were imperfect people. That law had claims which they had not met, and never would meet, in this life. It is very easy to flatter ourselves that we are perfect, if we make our own standard of character; it is not possible for man to set up a claim to perfection, if he measures himself by the standard of God's word; and all the claims of people to perfection are made simply because they do not properly understand what the law of God requires. Compare the notes at Job 9:20.

    Psalm 119:96"As the hart panteth after the water brooks,

    So panteth my soul after Thee, O God."

    Wesley's Notes on Psalms 119:96

    119:96 Perfection - Of the greatest and most perfect enjoyments in this world. Commandment - Thy word; one part of it being put for the whole. Broad - Or, large, both for extent, and for continuance: it is useful to all persons: it is of everlasting truth and efficacy; it will never deceive those who trust to it, as all worldly things will, but will make men happy both here and for ever.